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NCJ Number: 237440 Find in a Library
Title: Self-Control and Chinese Deviance: A Look Behind the Bamboo Curtain
Journal: International Journal of Criminal Justice Sciences  Volume:4  Issue:2  Dated:July - December 2009  Pages:131-143
Author(s): Michael A. Cretacci; Craig J. Rivera; Fei Ding
Date Published: December 2009
Page Count: 13
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: India
Annotation: In this study, which relies on data collected in a large Chinese university, both the traditional Grasmick et al. (1993) scale and Hirschi’s revised measure of self-control are tested.
Abstract: While self-control theory continues to generate debate, one shortcoming of the literature is that the perspective has only rarely been tested utilizing international data. Of the studies that have, the theory receives support for its claim that it can explain crime cross-nationally. An additional gap in the research is that scholars have largely ignored the fact that Hirschi (2004) revised the conceptualization of low self-control to reflect a one-dimensional, social bond type measure. As far as the authors know, this is the only test of the specific items that Hirschi stated make up the revised scale. In this study, which relies on data collected in a large Chinese university, both the traditional Grasmick et al. (1993) scale and Hirschi’s revised measure of self-control are tested. Results of the current study indicate that the revision may be an important explanation of Chinese deviance. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of how the theory has been tested in both the United States and international settings. (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): China; Crime causes theory; Deviance; Social bond theory; Social control theory
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=259470

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