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NCJ Number: 237497 Find in a Library
Title: Qualitative Study of Relationships Among Parenting Strategies, Social Capital, the Juvenile Justice System, and Mental Health Care for At-Risk African American Male Youth
Journal: Journal of Correctional Health Care  Volume:17  Issue:4  Dated:October 2011  Pages:319-328
Author(s): Joseph B. Richardson, Jr., Ph.D.; Mischelle Van Brakle J.D.
Date Published: October 2011
Page Count: 10
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Mental Health
Bethesda, MD 20852
Spencer Foundation
Chicago, IL 60611
William T. Grant Foundation
New York, NY 10022
Grant Number: 5R25MH080669
Document: PDF
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This article discusses that for poor, African-American families living in the inner city, the juvenile justice system has become a de facto mental health service provider.
Abstract: For many poor, African-American families living in the inner city, the juvenile justice system has become a de facto mental health service provider. In this article, longitudinal, ethnographic study methods were used to examine how resource-deprived, inner-city parents in a New York City community relied on the juvenile justice system to provide their Africa-American male children with mental health care resources. The results of three case studies indicate that this strategy actually contributed to an escalation in delinquency among the youth. (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Male juvenile delinquents
Index Term(s): Black/African Americans; Economic influences; Juvenile mental health services; Mental health; Parental attitudes; Parental influence; Socioculture; Urban
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=259528

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