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NCJ Number: 237649 Find in a Library
Title: Protective Role of Perceived Social Support Against the Manifestation of Depressive Symptoms in Peer Victims
Journal: Journal of School Violence  Volume:10  Issue:4  Dated:October-December 2011  Pages:393-412
Author(s): Diane Tanigawa; Michael J. Furlong; Erika D. Felix; Jill D. Sharkey
Date Published: October 2011
Page Count: 20
Document: PDF
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined the main and stress-buffering effects of perceived social support from various sources against the manifestation of depressive symptoms for peer victims
Abstract: Students who are victimized by their peers are at risk for developing depressive symptoms, which is detrimental for academic and social development. Social support may be a protective factor for peer victims, and the manner in which this occurs may vary according to gender, age, and other demographic variables. This study examined the main and stress-buffering effects of perceived social support from various sources against the manifestation of depressive symptoms for peer victims. A convenience sample of 544 seventh and eighth graders from three middle schools completed a survey assessing depressive symptoms, peer victimization experiences, and perceived social support from parents, teachers, classmates, and a close friend. Perceived social support from parents and from a close friend buffered the manifestation of depressive symptoms for male peer victims. Main effects, but not stress-buffering effects, were found for female peer victims across all sources of support. Implications of these findings, limitations of the study, and future directions are discussed. (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Bullying
Index Term(s): Childhood depression; Informal support groups; Juvenile social adjustment; Juvenile victims; Victimization
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=259681

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