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NCJ Number: 36031 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: WHITE RACISM, BLACK CRIME, AND AMERICAN JUSTICE - AN APPLICATION OF THE COLONIAL MODEL TO EXPLAIN CRIME AND RACE
Author(s): R STAPLES
Date Published: Unknown
Page Count: 19
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: FRANTZ FANON'S COLONIAL ANALOGY VIEWS THE BLACK COMMUNITY IN AMERICA AS AN UNDERDEVELOPED COLONY WHOSE ECONOMICS AND POLITICS ARE CONTROLLED BY LEADERS OF THE RACIALLY DOMINANT (WHITE AMERICAN) GROUP.
Abstract: THE AUTHOR MAINTAINS THAT THE COLONIAL CHARACTER OF AMERICAN SOCIETY TENDS TO STRUCTURE THE RACIAL PATTERN OF CRIME - WHITE COLLAR CRIMES USUALLY COMMITTED BY WEALTHY WHITES 60 UNPUNISHED OR LIGHTLY PUNISHED WHILE LESSER CRIMES COMMITTED BY BLACKS RESULT IN LONG JAIL SENTENCES; LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES ARE MORE TOLERANT OF ILLEGAL ACTIVITIES IN BLACK COMMUNITIES; MORE BLACKS THAN WHITES ARE ARRESTED FOR SERIOUS CRIMES ALTHOUGH WHITES COMMIT MORE; AND BLACKS ARE SENTENCED TO MORE AND LONGER PRISON TERMS.
Index Term(s): Black/African Americans; Caucasian/White Americans; Crime patterns; Judicial discretion; Police discretion; Political influences; Race relations; Racial discrimination
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=36031

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