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NCJ Number: 48675 Find in a Library
Title: FORENSIC PSYCHIATRY - DIAGNOSIS AND CRIMINAL RESPONSIBILITY
Journal: JOURNAL OF NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASE  Volume:162  Issue:6  Dated:(JUNE 1976)  Pages:423-429
Author(s): F A HENN; M HERJANIC; R H VANDERPEARL
Corporate Author: Williams and Wilkins Co
United States of America
Date Published: 1976
Page Count: 7
Sponsoring Agency: University of Iowa
Iowa City, IA 52242
Williams and Wilkins Co
Baltimore, MD 21202
Sale Source: University of Iowa
College of Medicine Dept of Psychiatry
500 Newton Road
Iowa City, IA 52242
United States of America
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: TO EXAMINE THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TYPE OF CRIME AND PSYCHIATRIC DIAGNOSIS, PRIMARY AND SECONDARY DIAGNOSES OF 1,195 DEFENDANTS ADMITTED TO AN URBAN FORENSIC SERVICE WERE ANALYZED.
Abstract: DIFFERENCES FOUND IN THE PROPORTIONS OF TYPES OF CRIMES FOR VARIOUS PSYCHIATRIC DIAGNOSES ARE NOT STRIKING. REFERRALS OF DEFENDANTS WITHOUT PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESS INVOLVE CRIMES AGAINST PERSONS TO A GREATER DEGREE THAN OTHER DIAGNOSTIC CATEGORIES, AND PROBABLY REFLECT CRITERIA FOR REFERRAL AND AN INDEX OF SUSPECTED PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER BY THOSE MAKING REFERRALS. AMONG PERSONS DIAGNOSED WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA, AFFECTIVE DISORDER, ORGANIC BRAIN DISORDER, AND MENTAL RETARDATION (DIAGNOSES WHICH MAY PROVIDE A BASIS FOR AN INSANITY PLEA), SCHIZOPHRENICS AND AFFECTIVE DISORDERED PERSONS ARE CHARGED WITH FEWER SEXUAL OFFENSES AND MORE OFFENSES AGAINST THE PUBLIC, WHILE THOSE WITH ORGANIC BRAIN SYNDROME OR MENTAL RETARDATION WERE MORE LIKELY TO BE CHARGED WITH SEXUAL OFFENSES. ABOUT ONE-FOURTH OF THE PATIENTS RECEIVED A SECONDARY DIAGNOSIS OF WHICH ALCOHOLISM AND DRUG ADDICTION WERE THE MOST COMMON. PERSONALITY DISORDER WAS THE SINGLE MOST COMMON DIAGNOSIS AMONG REFERRALS, AND SHOWED FAIRLY PROPORTIONAL DISTRIBUTION ACROSS CRIME CATEGORIES. SCHIZOPHRENICS WERE LEAST LIKELY TO BE CHARGED WITH FRAUD OR FORGERY, WHILE THIS WAS THE MOST COMMON CHARGE AMONG THE AFFECTIVE DISORDERED. MENTAL RETARDATES ARE MOST FREQUENTLY CHARGED WITH ARSON, WHILE PERSONALITY DISORDERED INDIVIDUALS ARE THE LEAST LIKELY TO BE SO CHARGED. THE CATEGORY OF THE 'OTHER DIAGNOSIS,' WHICH INCLUDED DIAGNOSED SEX DEVIANTS, CONTAINED THE MOST INDIVIDUALS CHARGED WITH SEXUAL OFFENSES. DEFENDANTS WITH NO PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESS ARE CHARGED MORE OFTEN WITH HOMICIDE, AND PERSONS WITH ORGANIC BRAIN SYNDROME ARE MORE LIKELY TO BE CHARGED WITH ASSAULT. IN GENERAL, NO SIGNIFICANT CORRELATIONS BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC DIAGNOSIS AND TYPES OF CRIMINAL ACTIVITY WERE FOUND. RESULTS OF A NUMBER OF PREVIOUS STUDIES OF THE CORRELATION BETWEEN DIAGNOSIS AND TYPES OF OFFENSE ARE SUMMARIZED. ALTHOUGH PSYCHOSIS IS RELATIVELY RARE IN ASSOCIATION WITH SERIOUS CRIMINAL ACTIVITY, SUCH CASES ARE FOUND AND IN THESE EXCEPTIONS PSYCHIATRIC INPUT CAN HELP PREVENT THE FAILURE TO TREAT A TREATABLE GROUP OF DEFENDANTS. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT PSYCHIATRY'S ABILITY TO PREDICT DANGEROUSNESS OR TREATABILITY OR TO DETERMINE QUESTIONS OF CRIMINAL RESPONSIBILITY ARE LIMITED. WHAT PSYCHIATRY CAN OFFER IS THE BEST INFORMATION ON THE INFLUENCE OF VARIOUS MENTAL ILLNESSES ON BEHAVIOR, THE EXPECTED RESULTS OF TREATMENT, AND ADVOCACY OF THE PATIENT'S NEEDS CONSISTENT WITH A RESPONSIBLE VIEW OF SOCIETAL REQUIREMENTS. REFERENCES ARE INCLUDED. (JAP)
Index Term(s): Behavior patterns; Behavioral science research; Crime prediction; Criminal responsibility; Emotional disorders; Forensic medicine; Mental disorders; Mentally ill offenders; Personality; Psychiatry; Psychological evaluation
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=48675

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