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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 50002 Find in a Library
Title: CRIME AND JUSTICE IN FIJI
Journal: CRIME ET/AND JUSTICE  Volume:5  Issue:3  Dated:(NOVEMBER 1977)  Pages:240-244
Author(s): C H S JAYEWARDENE
Corporate Author: University of Ottawa
Dept of Criminology
Canada
Date Published: 1977
Page Count: 5
Sponsoring Agency: University of Ottawa
Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 1E5, Canada
Type: Historical Overview
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: Canada
Annotation: THE HISTORY OF TRIBAL CRIME CONTROL IN FIJI, THE SMALL NUMBER OF VIOLENT CRIMES COMMITTED, AND THE RELAXED CHARACTER OF THE FIJI POLICE AND CORRECTIONS SYSTEM ARE DESCRIBED.
Abstract: THE PEOPLE OF FIJI WERE ORIGINALLY CANNIBALS. PUNISHMENT FOR MURDER DEPENDED UPON THE PURPOSE OF THE MURDER AND THE RANK OF THE MURDERER, AND TRIBAL LAW LOOKED MORE SEVERELY UPON VIOLATION OF LOCAL TABOOS THAN IT DID ON MURDER. IT WAS POSTULATED THAT THIS CULTURE WOULD BECOME A SUBCULTURE OF VIOLENCE WITH A HIGH INCIDENCE OF MURDER AND CRIMES OF VIOLENCE. THE REVERSE, HOWEVER, HAS HAPPENED. IN 1973 WITH A POPULATION OF 550,000 PEOPLE, THERE WERE SIX MURDERS COMMITTED, FOUR CASES OF MANSLAUGHTER, AND TWO INFANTICIDES. THE LARGEST NUMBER OF ARRESTS WERE FOR TRAFFIC OFFENSES AND VIOLATIONS OF LOCAL ORDINANCES. THE WORK OF THE ROYAL FIJI POLICE FORCE, WHICH NUMBERS 1,027 OFFICERS OR 2.05 OFFICERS PER 1000 POPULATION, IS DESCRIBED. THERE ARE NINE PRISONS EMPHASIZING WORK PROGRAMS AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING. THE LARGEST SOURCE OF CONFLICT INVOLVES THE INDIAN MINORITY WHO WERE BROUGHT TO FIJI AS LABORERS BY THE BRITISH IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. THIS GROUP HAS BEGUN TO DEMAND THEIR CIVIL RIGHTS. INTER-CULTURAL CONFLICT WITH THE NATIVE POPULATION REMAINS MINIMAL, HOWEVER, BECAUSE THE TWO GROUPS MAINTAIN SEPARATE IDENTITIES. THE FUTURE OF LAW ENFORCEMENT IN FIJI IS BRIEFLY CONSIDERED. FOOTNOTES CONTAIN REFERENCES. (GLR)
Index Term(s): Crime control policies; Crime Rate; Fiji Islands; Foreign correctional facilities; Foreign police; Police crime-prevention; Socioculture; Tribal history
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=50002

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