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NCJ Number: 50232 Find in a Library
Title: WHO CAN WORK WITH THE JUVENILE OFFENDER?
Journal: JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION  Volume:39  Issue:5  Dated:(SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1973)  Pages:23-25
Author(s): D PRICHARD
Corporate Author: National Rehabilitation Assoc
United States of America
Date Published: 1973
Page Count: 3
Sponsoring Agency: National Rehabilitation Assoc
Washington, DC 20005
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THE KANSAS VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION CENTER IN SALINA WAS CHOSEN BY THE KANSAS STATE DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AS THE SITE FOR IMPLEMENTING AN INNOVATIVE APPROACH TO WORKING WITH JUVENILES.
Abstract: THE JUVENILE OFFENDER REHABILITATION PROGRAM BEGAN IN 1972 AND INVOLVED 14 BOYS. BY APRIL 1973, 60 BOYS HAD BEEN ADMITTED TO THE PROGRAM. ONLY 14 BOYS DID NOT COMPLETE THE PROGRAM, AND 2 OF THE 14 RETURNED TO JAIL. TO BE ADMITTED TO THE CENTER, A BOY MUST BE 16 OR 17 YEARS OF AGE AND NOT BE RETARDED OR SEVERELY MENTALLY ILL. REFERRALS TO THE CENTER COME FROM JUVENILE COURTS IN ALL PARTS OF THE STATE. IN DEVELOPING THE PROGRAM, AN EFFORT WAS MADE TO AVOID THE FOLLOWING WEAKNESSES OBSERVED IN OTHER PROGRAMS: NO FOLLOWUP SERVICE; PROFESSIONAL STAFF WORKING EIGHT TO FIVE; COTTAGE PARENTS ACTING AS BABYSITTERS; STAFF FUNCTIONING IN CONVENTIONAL ROLES AT THE EXPENSE OF CLIENTS; LACK OF ADEQUATE BEHAVIOR CONTROLS; LACK OF STAFF INVOLVEMENT; LAXITY OF PROGRAMMING AFTER 5:00 P.M.; TOO MUCH UNSTRUCTURED FREE TIME; NO WORK INVOLVING PARENTS; AND NO WAY OF MONITORING BEHAVIOR OUTSIDE OF THE CENTER AREA. THERE ARE NO LOCKED DOORS AT THE CENTER, NO LOCKUP UNITS, AND NO GUARDS. GUIDED GROUP INTERACTION IS EMPLOYED, BASED ON PEER GROUP PRESSURE AS THE CATALYST FOR CHANGE. THE POINT SYSTEM HAS BEEN ONE OF THE ADVANTAGES OF THE CENTER PROGRAM, AS IT PROVIDES THE NECESSARY STRUCTURE AND IMMEDIATE CONSEQUENCES FOR BOTH GOOD AND BAD BEHAVIOR. EACH BOY IN THE PROGRAM VISITS THE KANSAS STATE INDUSTRIAL REFORMATORY IN HUTCHISON TO CLEAR UP ANY MISCONCEPTIONS HE MIGHT HAVE CONCERNING PRISON LIFE. SINCE PROLONGED DIRECT PARENTAL CONTACT IS NOT POSSIBLE, THE CENTER PROGRAM EMPLOYS A TRAVELING SOCIAL WORKER TO WORK WITH FAMILIES AND COMMUNITY AGENCIES WHICH WILL BE INVOLVED WITH THE BOYS WHEN THEY RETURN HOME. (DEP)
Index Term(s): Alternatives to institutionalization; Guided group interaction; Juvenile correctional facilities; Juvenile treatment methods; Kansas; Male juvenile delinquents; State correctional facilities
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=50232

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