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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 50561 Find in a Library
Title: NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS LAUNCH CRIME PREVENTION PROGRAMS
Journal: AGING  Issue:281-282  Dated:(MARCH/APRIL 1978)  Pages:32-34
Author(s): G SUNDERLAND
Corporate Author: US Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare
Admin on Aging
United States of America
Date Published: 1978
Page Count: 3
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
US Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare
Washington, DC 20203
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Document: PDF
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: FOLLOWING SOME CRITICISM OF MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT THE CRIMINAL VICTIMIZATION OF THE ELDERLY AND VALIDITY OF CRIME SURVEY DATA, CRIME PREVENTION EFFORTS BY TWO RETIREE ORGANIZATIONS ARE DISCUSSED.
Abstract: IT IS ARGUED THAT CRIME SURVEYS OF THE TYPE COMMONLY EMPLOYED BY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT INDICATE UPS AND DOWNS IN OVERALL VICTIMIZATION RATES BUT PROVIDE LITTLE INFORMATION ABOUT THE VICTIMIZATION OF THE ELDERLY. ALTHOUGH IT IS TRUE THAT THE ELDERLY HAVE LOW VICTIMIZATION RATES FOR SUCH SERIOUS CRIMES AS HOMICIDE, RAPE, AND AGGRAVATED ASSAULT, THEY HAVE HIGH VICTIMIZATION RATES FOR PURSE-SNATCHING AND STRONG-ARM ROBBERY. FURTHER, AN EXAMINATION OF POLICE OFFENSE REPORTS INDICATES THAT MOST CRIMES COMMITTED AGAINST THE ELDERLY CAN BE AVOIDED BY USING SIMPLE PREVENTION TECHNIQUES. IN 1972, THE NATIONAL RETIRED TEACHERS ASSOCIATION (NRTA) AND THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF RETIRED PERSONS (AARP) INSTITUTED A CRIME PREVENTION PROGRAM TO HELP OLDER PERSONS REDUCE CRIMINAL OPPORTUNITY AND THE RISK OF BEING VICTIMIZED, TO ALERT THEM TO THE REAL DANGERS, AND TO HELP DISPEL IMAGINED THREATS. AS THE PROGRAM DEVELOPED, IT BECAME APPARENT THAT LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ARE SYMPATHETIC TO THE PROBLEMS OF THE ELDERLY, BUT LACKED SPECIALIZED TRAINING IN THE AREA. REVIEWS BY THE NRTA-AARP FOUND THAT LITTLE RESEARCH HAD BEEN DONE REGARDING THE ROLE OF POLICE IN HANDLING THIS PROBLEM AND INDICATED A NEARLY COMPLETE LACK OF RESOURCES IN THE FIELD. IN 1973, THE ASSOCIATIONS BEGAN CONDUCTING TRAINING SEMINARS FOR POLICE TRAINERS, ADMINISTRATORS, AND OTHER HIGH LEVEL PROFESSIONALS IN THE LAW ENFORCEMENT COMMUNITY. IN 1976, THE LEAA AWARDED THE NRTA-AARP A GRANT TO DEVELOP A TRAINING COURSE BASED UPON THEIR EXPERIENCE IN CONDUCTING OVER 200 SEMINARS. THE COURSE COVERS FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION ON THE PROCESSES OF AGING AND TRANSLATES CERTAIN FACTS ABOUT AGING INTO PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS FOR USE BY LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS IN INCREASING THEIR EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS IN DEALING WITH THE ELDERLY AND THEIR UNIQUE CONCERNS. ONE OF THE PRINCIPAL OBJECTIVES IS TO ENCOURAGE THE OFFICER TO LOOK BEYOND STATISTICS TO CONSIDER THE VARYING IMPACTS OF CRIMES ON THE ELDERLY. SITE VISITS TO AREAS USING THE SENIOR CITIZEN AS A COMMUNITY CRIME PREVENTION AND SUPPORT SERVICE RESOURCE HAVE CONVINCED THE NRTA-AARP THAT THE ELDERLY CAN FULFILL VALUABLE SERVICES IN COMMUNITY PATROL, TRAFFIC CONTROL, SEARCH AND RESCUE, WATER SAFETY, AND A VARIETY OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS, INCLUDING THE MAKING OF CRIME PREVENTION PRESENTATIONS TO THE COMMUNITY. PHOTOS ILLUSTRATE THE TEXT. (KBL)
Index Term(s): Community involvement; Crime prevention measures; Crimes against the elderly; Fear of crime; Older Adults (65+); Victimization
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=50561

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