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NCJ Number: 50769 Find in a Library
Title: CRIMINAL VICTIMIZATION OF THE ELDERLY - THE PHYSICAL AND ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES
Author(s): F L COOK; W G SKOGAN; T D COOK; G E ANTUNES
Date Published: 1978
Page Count: 34
Type: Survey
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THE CURRENT CONSENSUS THAT THE PHYSICAL AND ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF CRIME ARE MORE SEVERE FOR THE ELDERLY IS EXAMINED, AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THIS GROUP'S FEAR OF CRIME AND THEIR LOWER VICTIMIZATION RATE IS DISCUSSED.
Abstract: A CONGRESSIONAL REPORT ON ELDERLY CRIME VICTIMIZATION CONCLUDED THAT THE ELDERLY SUFFER DISPROPORTIONATELY IN QUALITATIVE MEASURES FROM CRIME VICTIMIZATION, AND THAT PHYSICAL, ECONOMIC, AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH AGING INCREASE VULNERABILITY TO ATTACK AND MAGNIFY THE IMPACT OF VICTIMIZATION. THIS CURRENT CONSENSUS ABOUT CRIME AND ELDERLY AMERICANS IS EXAMINED USING NATIONAL SURVEY DATA GATHERED BY THE UNITED STATES CENSUS BUREAU IN 1973 AND 1974. TEN THOUSAND HOUSEHOLDS WERE VISITED EACH MONTH AND THEIR MEMBERS WERE INTERVIEWED ON CRIME OCCURRENCE. RELATIVE AND ABSOLUTE MEASURES OF ECONOMIC AND PHYSICAL CONSEQUENCES OF CRIME WERE USED AS DEPENDENT VARIABLES. FINDINGS ON FINANCIAL LOSSES SHOW THAT THE ELDERLY ARE LESS LIKELY THAN OTHERS TO BE INVOLVED IN CRIME, LOSE LESS THAN YOUNG PEOPLE, BUT THE SAME OR MORE THAN OTHER ADULTS. THE EVIDENCE SUGGESTS THAT THE ELDERLY ARE ATTACKED LESS OFTEN THAN OTHERS, ARE MORE LIKELY TO BE INJURED WHEN ATTACKED, SUFFER WOUNDS AND BROKEN BONES AND TEETH LESS THAN OTHERS, AND SUFFER INTERNAL INJURIRES AND CUTS AND BRUISES MORE THAN OTHERS. THEY ARE NO MORE LIKELY THAN OTHERS TO REQUIRE MEDICAL CARE, OR MORE COSTLY CARE AFTER AN ATTACK. HOWEVER, THE COSTS OF CARE CONSTITUTE A CONSIDERABLY LARGER PROPORTION OF THEIR INCOME THAN IN THE CASE OF OTHER GROUPS. THE CURRENT CONSENSUS ON CRIME AND THE ELDERLY IS INAPPROPRIATE AND NOT CORRECT FOR MOST CRIME, AND IT IS INCOMPLETE SINCE IT FAILS TO DIFFERENTIATE BETWEEN AGE TRENDS FOR DIFFERENT TYPES OF CONSEQUENCES. REASONS FOR THE EXISTENCE OF THE INCORRECT CONSENSUS ARE DISCUSSED. THE EXPLANATION FOR THE HIGH FEAR RATE AMONG THE ELDERLY PERHAPS REFLECTS THEIR CONDITION OF LOW INCOME SINCE THEY HAVE THE HIGHEST INCIDENCE OF POVERTY. POLICY SUGGESTIONS INCLUDE COMPENSATION FOR LOST PROPERTY FOR THE ELDERLY OR FOR ALL PERSONS SUFFERING FROM PHYSICAL OR PROPERTY CRIMES. TABLES ILLUSTRATE THE SURVEY DATA AND A BIBLIOGRAPHY IS PROVIDED. (DAG)
Index Term(s): Crime surveys; Fear of crime; Older Adults (65+); Victimization
Note: APPEARED IN GERONTOLOGIST (AUGUST 1978)
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=50769

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