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NCJ Number: 50966 Find in a Library
Title: IMPORTANCE GIVEN SELECTED JOB CHARACTERISTICS BY INDIVIDUALS WHO POSSESS A CRIMINAL JUSTICE DEGREE
Journal: CRIMINAL JUSTICE REVIEW  Volume:2  Issue:2  Dated:(FALL 1977)  Pages:93-100
Author(s): T T SULLIVAN
Corporate Author: Georgia State University
School of Urban Life
United States of America
Date Published: 1978
Page Count: 8
Sponsoring Agency: Georgia State University
Atlanta, GA 30303
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THE IMPORTANCE GIVEN SELECTED JOB CHARACTERISTICS BY 758 PERSONS WHO HAD RECEIVED CRIMINAL JUSTICE DEGREES WERE EXAMINED. IT WAS FOUND THAT JOB EXPECTATIONS VARIED SIGNIFICANTLY BY RACE AND BY SEX WITHIN RACE.
Abstract: THE STUDY POPULATION CONSISTED OF 717 MALES (49 OF WHOM WERE BLACK) AND 47 FEMALES (OF WHOM 7 WERE BLACK). MEDIAN AGE WAS 25 YEARS WITH A RANGE OF 18 TO 63 YEARS. THE STUDY EXAMINED POSSIBLE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN RACE, SEX, DEGREE OBTAINED, OCCUPATION CHOICE, AND SEVERAL JOB-RELATED FACTORS (JOB SATISFACTION, EFFECT OF EDUCATION ON PERFORMANCE, GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION, ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITY, INCOME, AND JOB PRESTIGE). TWO TABLES PRESENT THE STUDY DATA IN DETAIL. BLACKS CONSISTENTLY RANKED AS VERY IMPORTANT THE VARIABLES OF INCOME, COLLEAGUE COMPATIBILITY, GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION, AND OPPORTUNITY FOR ADVANCEMENT. IN CONTRAST, WHITES TENDED TO RATE THESE VARIABLES AS MODERATELY IMPORTANT. BLACKS TENDED TO FEEL DISSATISFIED WITH THEIR JOBS MORE SO THAN WHITES AND FELT THAT THEIR EDUCATION HAD LITTLE OR NO EFFECT ON THEIR PERFORMANCE. WHITES, ON THE OTHER HAND, WERE MORE SATISFIED AND ALSO STRESSED THAT EDUCATION HAD A DEFINITE EFFECT ON THEIR PERFORMANCE. BOTH GROUPS GAVE OPPORTUNITY FOR ADVANCEMENT AND PRESTIGE HIGH RANKINGS. DIFFERENCES BETWEEN RACIAL GROUPS BY SEX REFLECTED RACIAL DIFFERENCES AS A WHOLE. HOWEVER, WHITE FEMALES FELT THEIR EDUCATION HAD LITTLE EFFECT ON SALARY AND PROMOTION, WHILE BLACK FEMALES FELT EDUCATION HAD A DEFINITE EFFECT. THESE FINDINGS ARE DISCUSSED IN TERMS OF SOCIETAL EXPECTATIONS AND REFERENCE GROUP EXPECTATIONS. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT THE INFLUX OF BLACKS AND FEMALES INTO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM WILL RESULT IN CHANGES IN JOB PERCEPTIONS. (GLR)
Index Term(s): Black/African Americans; Criminal justice education; Females; Minorities; Minority employment; Morale; Perception; Studies; Work attitudes
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=50966

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