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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 51223 Find in a Library
Title: CHILD ABUSE AS VIEWED BY SUBURBAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS
Author(s): D A PELCOVITZ
Date Published: 1977
Page Count: 197
Sponsoring Agency: UMI Dissertation Services
Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346
Sale Source: UMI Dissertation Services
300 North Zeeb Road
P.O. Box 1346
Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346
United States of America
Type: Thesis/Dissertation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: QUESTIONNAIRES AND INTERVIEWS IDENTIFIED ATTITUDES AND CHILD ABUSE REPORTING PRACTICES OF 135 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS, PRINCIPALS AND SCHOOL WORKERS. COMPONENTS OF A GOOD SCHOOL ABUSE REPORTING SYSTEM ARE EXAMINED.
Abstract: THE SURVEY WAS CONDUCTED IN A RACIALLY AND SOCIODEMOGRAPHICALLY MIXED AREA IN SUBURBAN PHILADELPHIA, PA. IT WAS FOUND THAT, CONTRARY TO OTHER REPORTS IN THE LITERATURE, TEACHERS WERE NOT INDIFFERENT TO CHILD ABUSE. HOWEVER, THEIR KNOWLEDGE OF WHAT CONSTITUTES ABUSE AND HOW ABUSE SHOULD BE REPORTED VARIED WIDELY FROM SCHOOL TO SCHOOL. MOST TEACHERS WERE UNAWARE OF THEIR LEGAL PROTECTION AND NEARLY ALL INCORRECTLY FELT THEY WOULD HAVE TO APPEAR IN COURT. MOST LIMITED THEIR DEFINITIONS OF CHILD ABUSE TO GROSS PHYSICAL ABUSE OR NEGLECT. ON MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS, THEY EXTENDED THEIR DEFINITIONS TO INCLUDE SEXUAL ABUSE. THE OPEN-ENDED INTERVIEWS ARE GROUPED BY TEACHERS WHO HAVE NEVER REPORTED ABUSE, TEACHERS WHO HAVE SUSPECTED ABUSE BUT NOT REPORTED IT, AND TEACHERS WHO HAVE REPORTED ABUSE. REPORTING TEACHERS USED CUES NOT GENERALLY MENTIONED IN THE LITERATURE--TYPE OF FOOD A CHILD BRINGS FOR LUNCH, CHILD'S REACTION TO TEACHER DISCIPLINE, AND AGGRESSIVE ACTING-OUT BEHAVIOR AS WELL AS WITHDRAWN BEHAVIOR. THE BIGGEST FEAR AMONG TEACHERS SUSPECTING BUT NOT REPORTING ABUSE WAS THAT A REPORT WOULD MAKE THE SITUATION WORSE FOR THE CHILD. THE BIGGEST FACTOR BEHIND REPORTING WAS THE SUPPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL. A THOROUGH CASE STUDY OF A PRINCIPAL WHO INVESTIGATES EACH CASE BEFORE REPORTING TO CHILD SERVICES IS PRESENTED. THE NEGATIVE IMPACT OF THE CHILD SERVICES' WORKER WHO 'SIDES' WITH THE PARENT IS DISCUSSED. AN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR TEACHERS AND GREATER WELFARE-SCHOOL COOPERATION IS URGED. THE QUESTIONNAIRE, TABLES PRESENTING FINDINGS, AND A BIBLIOGRAPHY ARE INCLUDED. (GLR)
Index Term(s): Attitudes; Child abuse; Citizen crime reporting; Juvenile dependency and neglect; Laws and Statutes; Pennsylvania; Public education
Note: UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA - DOCTORAL DISSERTATION
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=51223

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