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NCJ Number: 51390 Find in a Library
Title: SCHOOL CRIME, POWER, AND THE STUDENT SUBCULTURE (FROM SCHOOL CRIME AND DISRUPTION, 1978, BY ERNST WENK AND NORA HARLOW - SEE NCJ-51386)
Author(s): R L DAVID
Corporate Author: Responsible Action
United States of America
Date Published: 1978
Page Count: 10
Sponsoring Agency: Responsible Action
Davis, CA 95616
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THE IMBALANCE BETWEEN THE INSTITUTIONALIZED POWER OF THE SCHOOL AND THE SUBCULTURAL POWER OF THE STUDETNS IS EXAMINED AS A STIMULUS TO SCHOOL CRIME.
Abstract: THE TYPES OF POWER EMPLOYED BY SCHOOL PERSONNEL AND STUDENTS ARE ANALYZED AND COMPARED. THE FOLLOWING TYPES OF POWER ARE ATTRIBUTED TO SCHOOL PERSONNEL: (1) THE POWER TO PROVIDE REWARDS AND ADMINSTER PUNISHMENTS, WHICH INCLUDES GRADING AND DISCIPLINING; (2) THE POWER OF EXPERTISE, WHICH INVOLVES THE PROJECTION OF SPECIAL SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE AS A MEANS OF INFLUENCING STUDENTS; (3) REFERENT POWER, WHICH INVOLVES THE DEVELOPMENT OF A RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TEACHER AND STUDENT PERCEIVED BY THE STUDENT AS BEING MAINTAINED BY PLEASING THE TEACHER; AND (4) LEGITIMATE POWER, WHICH INVOLVES BEING IN A POSITION WHICH IN ITSELF HOLDS TRADITIONAL AND ACCEPTED POWER USES. IN CONTRAST TO THIS ARRAY OF POWER RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO TEACHERS AND OTHER SCHOOL PERSONNEL, STUDENTS ARE VIEWED AS HAVING SIGNIFICANTLY FEWER POWER RESOURCES TO USE IN INFLUENCING SCHOOL PERSONNEL. COERCIVE POWER IS BELIEVED TO BE THE MAJOR POWER RESOURCE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS. VIOLENCE, VANDALISM, AND RULEBREAKING BECOME BEHAVIORAL MEANS FOR STUDENTS TO EXPERIENCE A POWER CENTER THAT IS THEIR OWN IN CONTRAST TO AN IDENTITY OF TOTAL SUBMISSIVENESS TO THE POWER AND CONTROL OF SCHOOL AUTHORITIES. IT IS BELIEVED THIS NEED TO ESTABLISH AN INDEPENDENT POWER CENTER IS STIMULATED BY A STUDENT SUBCULTURE GOVERNED BY A PHILOSOPHY OF FREEDOM THAT RESISTS THE POWER IMBALANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF MOST SCHOOLS. IT IS URGED THAT SCHOOLS TAKE STEPS TO REDRESS THE SEVERE IMBALANCE OF POWER THAT EXISTS BETWEEN STUDENTS AND THE REPRESENTATIVES OF THE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION, SUCH THAT STUDENTS CAN EXPERIENCE THAT THEY HAVE THE POWER TO INFLUENCE THE ENVIRONMENT WITHIN WHICH LIVES ARE MOLDED. (RCB)
Index Term(s): Cause removal crime prevention; Social organization; Socioculture; Students
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=51390

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