skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 51405 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: IMPACT AND OPERATIONAL FEATURES OF PROGRAMS DESIGNED TO MODIFY DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR IN THE DADE COUNTY (FL) PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 1975-76
Author(s): ANON
Corporate Author: Dade Cty Public Schools
United States of America
Date Published: 1976
Page Count: 76
Sponsoring Agency: Dade Cty Public Schools
Miami, FL 33132
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Program/Project Evaluation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL AND SPECIAL INSTRUCTION PROGRAMS USED IN MIAMI, FLA., TO MODIFY THE BEHAVIOR OF DISRUPTIVE STUDENTS IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS ARE DESCRIBED AND EVALUATED.
Abstract: THE ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL PROGRAM OPERATES THROUGH FOUR FACILITIES AT THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL LEVELS. THE PROGRAM FEATURES INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION IN THE BASIC SKILLS, EXTENSIVE OPPORTUNITY FOR COUNSELING AND VOCATIONAL PREPARATION, SMALL CLASS SIZE, AND USE OF BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION APPROACHES FOR DEVELOPING APPROPRIATE ACADEMIC AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR. STUDENTS SENT TO THE ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS HAVE BEEN JUDGED TO BE SOCIALLY MALADJUSTED. THE SCHOOL CENTERS FOR SPECIAL INSTRUCTION (SCSI), LOCATED IN EACH SECONDARY SCHOOL, PROVIDE PROBLEM STUDENTS WITH A BRIEF 'TIME OUT' FROM THEIR REGULAR CLASS SETTINGS, OFFERING AN ENVIRONMENT IN WHICH THE STUDENT CAN CONTINUE THE REGULAR ACADEMIC PROGRAM UNDER CLOSE SUPERVISION. STUDENTS ARE ASSIGNED TO THE CENTERS BY TEACHERS OR ADMINISTRATORS FOR PERIODS OF 3 TO 5 DAYS. ACADEMIC AND SOCIAL GUIDANCE COUNSELING IS MADE AVAILABLE TO THE STUDENTS. INTERVIEWS WITH ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL STAFF INDICATED GENERAL ADHERENCE TO MOST OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES, ALTHOUGH BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION TACTICS WERE NOT BEING APPLIED IN AT LEAST ONE OF THE SCHOOLS. THERE WERE SOME PROBLEMS IN GAINING COOPERATION FROM PARENTS. STUDENTS FELT THAT THE PROGRAMS WERE HELPFUL. FOR STUDENTS STILL IN THE ALTERNATIVE PROGRAM, POSITIVE CHANGES IN MOTIVATION, PERFORMANCE, AND BEHAVIOR WERE NOTED. HOWEVER, ABOUT 20 PERCENT OF THE STUDENTS WERE EVALUATED AS NEVER BEING ABLE TO RETURN TO THE REGULAR SCHOOL PROGRAM, AND 11 PERCENT WERE THOUGHT NEVER TO BE ABLE TO GRADUATE. OF THE STUDENTS WHO HAD RETURNED, 20 PERCENT WERE EVALUATED AS REQUIRING REASSIGNMENT TO THE ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL. HOWEVER, FOR THE BEHAVIORS USED TO DEFINE THE DISRUPTIVE SYNDROME, THE MAJORITY OF FORMER ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL STUDENTS WERE EVALUATED AS 'BETTER OR NO WORSE' THAN OTHER STUDENTS IN THEIR CLASSES. OBSERVATION OF SCSI CLASSES INDICATED THAT STUDENT BEHAVIOR WAS BEING CONTROLLED AND APPROPRIATELY DIRECTED IN MOST CASES. ALTHOUGH NO FORMAL EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF SCSI'S ON STUDENT BEHAVIOR WAS PERFORMED, TEACHERS SEEMED TO FEEL THAT SCSI'S WERE EFFECTIVE. ANALYSIS OF DATA ON STUDENTS SUSPENDED FOR INVOLVEMENT IN RELATIVELY SERIOUS MISBEHAVIOR REVEALED A PATTERN OF LOW ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT, TRUANCY, VERBAL ASSAULTS ON STAFF, AND PHYSICAL ASSAULTS ON FELLOW STUDENTS. SIGNIFICANT PERCENTAGES OF THESE STUDENTS HAD BEEN EXPOSED TO SCSI'S AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS. AMONG RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THE DEVELOPMENT OF EARLY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES, AND INSERVICE TRAINING TO HELP REGULAR CLASSROOM TEACHERS COPE WITH DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR. SUPPORTING DATA ARE INCLUDED. (AUTHORS ABSTRACT MODIFIED--LKM)
Index Term(s): Behavior modification; Counseling; Discipline; Florida; Problem behavior; Program evaluation; Students
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=51405

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.