skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 51407 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: ORDER AND DISRUPTION IN A DESEGREGRATED HIGH SCHOOL
Journal: CRIME AND DELINQUENCY  Volume:24  Issue:3  Dated:(JULY 1978)  Pages:277-289
Author(s): G W NOBLIT; T W COLLINS
Corporate Author: National Council on Crime and Delinquency
United States of America
Date Published: 1978
Page Count: 13
Sponsoring Agency: National Council on Crime and Delinquency
Newark, NJ 07102
US Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare
Washington, DC 20203
Contract Number: 400-76-0009
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THE EFFECTS OF CHANGES IN ADMINISTRATIVE STYLE ON THE CHARACTER OF ORDER AND DISRUPTION IN A DESEGREGATED HIGH SCHOOL IN MEMPHIS, TENN., ARE EXAMINED.
Abstract: DATA FOR THE ANALYSIS WERE OBTAINED DURING 2 YEARS OF OBSERVATION OF 'CROSSOVER HIGH,' A FORMERLY ALL-WHITE HIGH SCHOOL THAT WAS DESEGREGATED IN 1972. UNDER THE DESEGREGATION PLAN, THE PRINCIPAL OF A FORMERLY ALL BLACK SCHOOL, TOGETHER WITH HALF OF HIS STAFF, MOVED TO TAKE CHARGE OF CROSSOVER HIGH. FACED WITH A NUMBER OF PROBLEMS, THE PRINCIPAL ESSENTIALLY HAD TO CREATE HIS OWN ACADEMIC SUBSYSTEM WITHOUT THE SUPPORT OF THE COMMUNITY, PARENTS, AND SIGNIFICANT SEGMENTS OF HIS TEACHING STAFF. THE SECOND PRINCIPAL, ALSO A BLACK, BEGAN HIS TENURE WITH 4 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WITH DESEGREGATION, BUT IN A PREDOMINANTLY BLACK COMMUNITY. THE TWO PRINCIPALS ADDRESSED PROBLEMS OF UNDESIRABLE STUDENT BEHAVIOR IN DIFFERENT WAYS. THE FIRST PRINCIPAL RELIED LARGELY ON NEGOTIATED ORDER, ATTEMPTING TO FOSTER COMMITMENT TO THE SCHOOL BY INDEBTING STUDENTS TO THE ADMINISTRATION. THE SECOND PRINCIPAL RELIED ON BUREAUCRATIC ORDER; I.E., THE STRICT, IMPARTIAL ENFORCEMENT OF RULES. BOTH PRINCIPALS HAD TO DEAL WITH A STUDENT POPULATION DIVIDED BY CLASS, RACE, AND COMMITMENT TO SCHOOL. THE FIRST PRINCIPAL, WITH HIS WILLINGNESS TO NEGOTIATE RULES WITH STUDENTS, EVENTUALLY LOST CREDIBILITY AND WAS TRANSFERRED. THE SECOND PRINCIPAL'S BUREAUCRATIC APPROACH BROUGHT STUDENT DEFIANCE. BOTH PRINCIPALS ACTED IN GOOD FAITH AND WERE COMPETENT PROFESSIONALS, BUT THEY WERE FACED WITH A SITUATION FOR WHICH THERE WERE NO GROUND RULES. A WORKABLE SOLUTION APPEARS TO REQUIRE THAT SCHOOLS MAXIMIZE THE INVOLVEMENT OF STUDENTS IN THE EVERYDAY PROCESS AND EXPERIENCES OF THE SCHOOL. A STUDY OF ANOTHER DESEGREGATED SCHOOL IN THE SOUTH INDICATES HOW NOTIONS OF NEGOTIATED AND BUREAUCRATIC ORDER CAN BE COMBINED EFFECTIVELY IN A DESEGREGATED SCHOOL, IF STUDENTS ARE INCLUDED IN THE PROCESS. (LKM)
Index Term(s): Discipline; Race relations; Students; Tennessee
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=51407

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.