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NCJ Number: 51419 Find in a Library
Title: WHAT KIDS DO TO SCHOOLS, AND WHAT SCHOOLS DO TO KIDS, PART 2
Author(s): ANON
Corporate Author: George Washington University
Institute for Educational Leadership
United States of America

National Public Radio
United States of America
Date Published: 1978
Page Count: 35
Sponsoring Agency: George Washington University
Washington, DC 20036
National Public Radio
Washington, DC 20036
Publication Number: PROGRAM 107
Sale Source: National Public Radio
2025 M Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: COMMENTS ON THE PROBLEM OF VIOLENCE IN THE SCHOOLS AND ON APPROACHES TO COMBATING THE PROBLEM ARE PRESENTED IN THE TRANSCRIPT OF A PUBLIC RADIO PROGRAM.
Abstract: THE PROGRAM IS FROM THE SERIES 'OPTIONS IN EDUCATION,' COPRODUCED BY NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO AND THE INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP OF THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY (WASHINGTON D.C.). PART 1 OF THE PROGRAM (SEE NCJ-51418) PRESENTED THE VIEWS OF STUDENTS AND SCHOOL PERSONNEL AT A CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL EXPERIENCING PROBLEMS WITH STUDENT ASSAULTS ON TEACHERS AND ON EACH OTHER. PART 2 FOCUSES ON THE FINDINGS OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 'SAFE SCHOOL STUDY,' CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION (NIE). THREE STATE SUPERINTENDENTS OF EDUCATION COMMENT ON VIOLENCE IN THE SCHOOLS, SUGGESTING THAT THE SCHOOLS ARE BASICALLY SAFE, OR AT LEAST SAFER THAN THEY ONCE WERE. FINDINGS FROM THE NIE STUDY ARE CITED BY THE SUPERINTENDENTS AND BY THE DIRECTOR OF NIE. THE STUDY CONCLUDED THAT STRONG LEADERSHIP BY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS, RATHER THAN STRONGER SCHOOL SECURITY, IS THE KEY TO MAKING SCHOOLS SAFE. CONGRESSWOMAN SHIRLEY CHISHOLM SUGGESTS THAT THE STUDY'S ESTIMATES OF THE EXTENT OF VIOLENCE AND VANDALISM IN THE SCHOOLS ARE CONSERVATIVE, NOTING THAT SCHOOL PRINCIPALS WERE THE PRIMARY SOURCE OF DATA. THE DIRECTOR OF THE EDUCATION POLICY RESEARCH INSTITUTE POINTS OUT THAT TESTIMONY BY SCHOOL SECURITY AGENTS AT CONGRESSIONAL HEARINGS ON SCHOOL VIOLENCE AND VANDALISM TENDED TO EXAGGERATE THE PROBLEM. EXCERPTS FROM OTHER TESTIMONY AT THE HEARINGS REFLECT DISAGREEMENT AS TO THE EFFECTIVENESS OF VARIOUS APPROACHES TO THE PROBLEM OF SCHOOL VIOLENCE. SCHOOL SECURITY AND DISCIPLINE PROGRAMS IN MARYLAND, MICHIGAN, AND NEW YORK ARE DESCRIBED. THE CONCEPT OF CREATIVE DISCIPLINE THROUGH INSCHOOL SUSPENSION IS DISCUSSED, AND THE INSCHOOL SUSPENSION PROGRAM EMPLOYED BY THE CHICAGO, ILL., PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS DESCRIBED. CRITICISM OF THE CHICAGO PROGRAM'S ISOLATION OF PROBLEM STUDENTS IS ALSO NOTED. IT IS CONCLUDED THAT, ALTHOUGH STUDENTS DO APPROXIMATELY $200 MILLION WORTH OF DAMAGE TO THE SCHOOLS EACH YEAR, THE SCHOOLS ARE, FOR THE MOST PART, SAFE. IT IS FURTHER CONCLUDED THAT THE QUESTION REMAINS AS TO WHETHER THE LARGELY AUTOCRATIC SCHOOL SYSTEM PROVIDES THE BEST POSSIBLE PREPARATION FOR LIFE IN A DEMOCRACY. A REPORT OF THE FINDINGS OF THE SAFE SCHOOL STUDY IS APPENDED. (LKM)
Index Term(s): High school education; School security; School vandalism; Students; Violence
Note: OPTIONS IN EDUCATION TRANSCRIPT
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=51419

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