skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 51629 Find in a Library
Title: WHY LAWYERS BECOME JUDGES
Journal: JUDICATURE  Volume:62  Issue:4  Dated:(OCTOBER 1978)  Pages:166-175
Author(s): M VOLCANSEK-CLARK
Corporate Author: American Judicature Soc
United States of America
Date Published: 1978
Page Count: 10
Sponsoring Agency: American Judicature Soc
Chicago, IL 60601-7401
Institute for Scientific Information
Philadelphia, PA 19104
UMI Dissertation Services
Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346
Sale Source: UMI Dissertation Services
300 North Zeeb Road
P.O. Box 1346
Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346
United States of America

Institute for Scientific Information
University City Science Ctr
3501 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: FACTORS IN ATTRACTING AND RETAINING JUDGES THAT EMERGED FROM A 1975 SURVEY OF 72 SITTING JUDGES (39 RESPONSES) AND 200 LAWYERS (134 RESPONSES) IN MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLA., ARE DISCUSSED.
Abstract: THE SURVEY ATTEMPED TO DETERMINE WHY SOME ATTORNEYS SEEK JUDICIAL OFFICE AND RETAIN THAT POSITION WHILE OTHERS DO NOT. COMPARISONS WERE DRAWN AMONG SITTING JUDGES, ATTORNEYS ASPIRING TO JUDICIAL CAREERS, AND ATTORNEYS NOT INTERESTED IN HOLDING JUDICIAL OFFICE. THE PERSONAL AND LEGAL CAREER CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPONDENTS WERE EXAMINED, AS WERE THEIR PERCEPTIONS OF THE COSTS AND BENEFITS OF SEEKING AND HOLDING JUDICIAL OFFICE. MOST SITTING JUDGES CAME FROM CIVIL OR GENERAL LEGAL PRACTICES, BUT MOST ATTORNEYS ASPIRING TO A JUDICIAL POSITION WERE FROM CRIMINAL AND GOVERNMENT PRACTICES. FORTY-SIX PERCENT OF THE SITTING JUDGES SERVED AS A PROSECUTING ATTORNEY AT SOME POINT. THE DATA ALSO INDICATE THAT SOLO PRACTITIONERS ARE MORE LIKELY TO SEEK JUDICIAL OFFICE THAN ARE OTHER LAWYERS (MEMBERS OF FIRMS, CORPORATE ATTORNEYS). RESPONDENTS CITED INCOME FACTORS (MANY ATTORNEYS HAVE INCOMES DOUBLE OR TRIPLE THAT OF JUDGES) AND THE COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH CAMPAIGNING FOR OFFICE AND WITH ACQUIRING THE LABEL 'POLITICIAN' AS RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH BECOMING A JUDGE. THE MAJORITY STATED A PREFERENCE FOR MERIT SELECTION AND RETENTION. THE BENEFITS ASSOCIATED WITH BEING A JUDGE TENDED TO BE INTANGIBLE: FEELINGS OF ACCOMPLISHMENT, ABILITY TO IMPROVE THE SYSTEM, PRESTIGE. ONE IMPLICATION OF THE SURVEY FINDINGS IS THAT IMPROVING JUDICIAL SALARIES AND REMOVING THE NECESSITY FOR CAMPAIGNING WOULD ENLARGE THE POOL OF POTENTIAL CANDIDATES FOR THE BENCH. SUPPORTING DATA ARE INCLUDED. (LKM)
Index Term(s): Attorneys; Florida; Judges; Personnel retention; Recruitment; Surveys
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=51629

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.