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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 51794 Find in a Library
Title: SOME FURTHER THOUGHTS ON PROBABILITIES AND HUMAN HAIR COMPARISONS
Journal: JOURNAL OF FORENSIC SCIENCES  Volume:23  Issue:4  Dated:(OCTOBER 1978)  Pages:758-763
Author(s): B D GAUDETTE
Corporate Author: American Acad of Forensic Sciences
United States of America
Date Published: 1978
Page Count: 6
Sponsoring Agency: American Acad of Forensic Sciences
Colorado Springs, CO 80901-0669
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 2N1, Canada
Sale Source: Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Crime Detection Laboratory
Hair and Fibre Section
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 2N1,
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: TWO EXPERIMENTS ARE REPORTED WHICH INDICATE THE RANGE OF USEFULNESS OF HUMAN HAIR COMPARISONS AS COURT EVIDENCE. IT IS CONCLUDED THAT CERTAIN TYPES OF COMPARISONS ARE EXTREMELY USEFUL WHILE OTHERS HAVE LIMITED VALUE.
Abstract: TWO TYPES OF EXPERIMENTS INVOLING MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC HAIR COMPARISONS WERE EACH CARRIED OUT THREE TIMES. IN THE FIRST, THREE LABORATORY TRAINEES WERE GIVEN A SAMPLE OF 80 HAIRS FROM THE SCALP OF A CAUCASIAN INDIVIDUAL. THEY THEN WERE GIVEN 100 SINGLE HAIRS FROM 100 INDIVIDUALS, 1 OF WHICH CAME FROM THE ORIGINAL REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLE. TWO OF THE THREE TRAINEES CORRECTLY MATCHED THE ONE HAIR WITH THE SAMPLE, AND THE THIRD TRAINEE FOUND FOUR HAIRS SIMILAR TO THE SAMPLE. THE SECOND EXPERIMENT COMPARED 1 HAIR TO 100 STANDARD SAMPLES; AGAIN, THE CORRECT MATCH WAS ACHIEVED BY TWO OF THREE TECHNICIANS, AND THE THIRD PICKED TWO POSSIBLE SAMPLES, THE CORRECT ONE AND ONE SIMILAR. THESE EXPERIMENTS POINT OUT THAT HAIR ANALYSIS IS SUBJECTIVE, BUT STILL CAN BE VALID AS SUPPORTING EVIDENCE OR AS A MEANS OF RULING OUT POSSIBILITIES. WHEN HAIR HAS BEEN BLEACHED OR DYED, IT BECOMES EVEN MORE USEFUL AS EVIDENCE. THE USE OF HAIR TO DETERMINE RACIAL CHARACTERISTICS AND TO DETERMINE SEX IS DISCUSSED. A CASE HISTORY DEMONSTRATES THE USE OF HAIR ANALYSIS TO FREE A SUSPECT IN A MURDER CASE; A SECOND PERSON LATER CONFESSED. IT IS CONCLUDED THAT ALTHOUGH HAIR STRANDS WILL NEVER BE AS INDIVIDUAL AS FINGERPRINTS, USE OF HAIR ANALYSIS CAN PROVIDE VALUABLE EVIDENCE. REFERENCES ARE APPENDED. (GLR)
Index Term(s): Crime laboratories; Criminal investigation; Evidence identification; Hair and fiber analysis; Trace evidence
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=51794

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