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NCJ Number: 51961 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: POLICE IN COLLEGE - THE VALUE GAP REVISITED
Journal: PSYCHOLOGICAL REPORTS  Volume:41  Issue:3  Dated:(1977)  Pages:1023-1029
Author(s): J BALKIN; C KATZ; J LEVIN; D BRANDT
Corporate Author: John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Prisoner Reentry Institute
United States of America
Date Published: 1977
Page Count: 7
Sponsoring Agency: John Jay College of Criminal Justice
New York, NY 10019
US Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare
Washington, DC 20202
Grant Number: G00-75-00370
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: DIFFERENCES IN VALUES AMONG FOUR GROUPS OF POLICE AND CIVILIANS WHO EITHER HAVE OR HAVE NOT ATTENDED COLLEGE ARE EXPLORED.
Abstract: THE ROKEACH VALUE SURVEY WAS COMPLETED BY 182 STUDENTS (114 POLICE, 68 CIVILIANS) AT JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN NEW YORK, N.Y., AND BY 173 PERSONS (38 POLICE, 135 CIVILIANS) WHO HAD NOT ATTENDED COLLEGE. ALL SUBJECTS WERE MEN FROM AN URBAN POPULATION. THE MEAN AGE WAS 22 YEARS (26 FOR POLICE, 21 FOR CIVILIANS). MOST OF THE NONCOLLEGE GROUP OF CIVILIANS WERE MINORITY ETHNIC YOUTHS PARTICIPATING IN A MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT TRAINING PROGRAM ADMINISTERED BY THE NEW YORK CITY POLICE ACADEMY. THE ROKEACH SURVEY MEASURES THE IMPORTANCE OF 18 INSTRUMENTAL VALUES (E.G., AMBITIOUS, HONEST, LOGICAL) AND 18 TERMINAL VALUES (E.G., AN EXCITING LIFE, INNER HARMONY, SOCIAL RECOGNITION). PERSONAL VALUES WERE MORE IMPORTANT TO POLICE, AND SOCIAL VALUES WERE MORE IMPORTANT TO CIVILIANS. THE KEY VALUES OF EQUALITY, BROADMINDED, AND FORGIVING WERE LESS IMPORTANT TO POLICE THAN TO CIVILIANS. THERE WERE MORE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN COLLEGE POLICE AND CIVILIANS THAN BETWEEN NONCOLLEGE POLICE AND CIVILIANS. THE ADDITIONAL DIFFERENCES INVOLVED A GREATER EMPHASIS ON INTERPERSONAL VALUES (HONEST, LOVING, RESPONSIBLE) FOR COLLEGE POLICE. IN CONTRAST TO CIVILIANS, FOR WHOM CONSIDERABLE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN STUDENTS AND NONSTUDENTS WERE FOUND, THERE WERE FEW VALUE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN POLICE STUDENTS AND NONSTUDENT OFFICERS. COLLEGE POLICE VALUED RESPONSIBLE MORE AND OBEDIENT AND AMBITIOUS LESS THAN NONCOLLEGE POLICE. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT THE KINDS OF VALUES AFFECTED BY COLLEGE ORIENTATION AND EXPERIENCE ARE NOT THE PERSONAL AND SOCIAL VALUES MOST CENTRAL TO THE VALUE GAP BETWEEN POLICE AND CIVILIANS. IT IS FURTHER SUGGESTED THAT THE VALUE CONFLICT BETWEEN POLICE AND POLICED MAY BE AN EXTERNAL MANIFESTATION OF AN INTERNAL CONFLICT RESOLVED THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT OF ADAPTIVE PERSONALITY DEFENSES THAT ARE REINFORCED BY THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM. SUPPORTING DATA AND A LIST OF REFERENCES ARE INCLUDED. (LKM)
Index Term(s): Higher education; New York; Police attitudes; Police education; Public Attitudes/Opinion; Studies
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=51961

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