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NCJ Number: 52286 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: YOUTH PATROLS - AN EXPERIMENT IN COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION
Journal: CIVIL RIGHTS DIGEST  Volume:3  Issue:2  Dated:(SPRING 1970)  Pages:1-7
Author(s): T A KNOPF
Corporate Author: US Cmssn on Civil Rights
United States of America
Date Published: 1970
Page Count: 7
Sponsoring Agency: US Cmssn on Civil Rights
Washington, DC 20425
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS AND TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS WERE USED TO ASSESS THE EFFECTIVENESS OF YOUTH PATROLS IN CALMING CIVIL VIOLENCE AND KEEPING ORDER. THE STUDY COVERS 12 CITIES FOR THE PERIOD 1967 TO 1968.
Abstract: THE STUDY COVERED THE CITIES OF TAMPA, FLA.; DAYTON, OHIO; ATLANTA, GA; DES MOINES, IOWA; GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.; NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y.; SAGINAW, MICH.; EAST PALO ALTO, CALIF.; PROVIDENCE, R.I.; PITTSBURGH, PA.; BOSTON, MASS.; AND NEWARK, N.J. IN 10 OF THE 12 CITIES YOUTH PATROLS WERE ESTABLISHED DURING AN OUTBREAK OF RACIAL VIOLENCE. IN DES MOINES AND GRAND RAPIDS, PATROLS WERE ESTABLISHED A MONTH OR TWO BEFORE ANY VIOLENCE BEGAN. A SURVEY OF NEWSPAPER REPORTS AND TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS WITH POLICE OFFICIALS AND COMMUNITY LEADERS SHOWED THAT THE PATROLS WERE AMAZINGLY EFFECTIVE AT COOLING RACIAL TENSIONS AND PREVENTING VIOLENCE. THE MINORITY YOUTHS WHO SERVED ON THE PATROLS DID SO OUT OF A SENSE OF DUTY TO THEIR NEIGHBORHOODS. BOTH POLICE AND PATROL MEMBERS WERE SUSPICIOUS OF EACH OTHER, BUT DURING THE TENSE PERIOD OF 1967 TO 1968, BOTH SIDES KEPT THEIR EMOTIONS UNDER CONTROL AND THE TWO GROUPS WORKED TOGETHER QUITE WELL. THE PATROLS ALSO OPENED UP COMMUNICATIONS BETWEEN GHETTO RESIDENTS AND THE WHITE POWER STRUCTURE. A SURVEY OF LITERATURE ON REVOLUTION SHOWS THAT THE YOUNG ARE THE THE MOST LIKELY TO PARTICIPATE IN VIOLENCE. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT THE YOUTH PATROLS, BY EXERTING PEER PRESSURE, ARE THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAY TO COMBAT SUCH VIOLENCE. THE FACT THAT MOST PATROLS WERE DISBANDED AFTER THE RIOTS IS DECRIED. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT SUCH GROUPS BE UTILIZED FOR NONRACIAL SITUATIONS, SUCH AS COMBATTING CAMPUS CRIME OR COMBATTING NEIGHBORHOOD VANDALISM. SOURCES OF YOUTH PATROL FUNDING ARE EXPLORED. (GLR)
Index Term(s): California; Citizen patrols; Civil disorders; Florida; Georgia (USA); Iowa; Massachusetts; Michigan; New Jersey; New York; Ohio; Pennsylvania; Rhode Island; Riot control; Riot prevention; Youth (Under 15)
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=52286

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