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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 62521 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: CARING SOCIETY - A STUDY OF THE INCEPTION AND GROWTH OF THE VICTIMS SUPPORT SCHEMES IN ENGLAND AND WALES, WITH SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE POLICE ROLE IN THEIR OPERATION AND ADMINISTRATION
Author(s): M B TAYLOR
Corporate Author: Police College
United Kingdom
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 23
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
Police College
Basingstoke, Hampshire, England
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United Kingdom
Annotation: VICTIM SUPPORT SCHEMES IN ENGLAND AND WALES ARE DESCRIBED; ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE, STAFFING, SERVICES, FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS, AND THE ROLE OF THE POLICE IN SUCH PROGRAMS ARE HIGHLIGHTED.
Abstract: THE FIRST VICTIM SUPPORT SCHEME WAS ESTABLISHED IN BRISTOL, ENGLAND, IN 1972 BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE CARE AND RE-SETTLEMENT OF OFFENDERS IN COOPERATION WITH THE BRISTOL POLICE. THE AIMS, METHODS, PROBLEMS, AND RESULTS OF THE PROGRAM WERE COPIED AND EXPERIENCED BY ALL SUBSEQUENTLY ESTABLISHED SUPPORT SCHEMES. THE INITIAL PURPOSE OF THE SCHEME WAS 'TO VISIT EVERY CRIME VICTIM, ASSESS THEIR NEEDS, AND OFFER ASSISTANCE WHERE POSSIBLE.' THE PROJECT ADMINISTRATOR CONTACTED POLICE DAILY AND RECEIVED DETAILS OF THOSE VICTIMS REPORTED WITHIN THE PREVIOUS 24 HOURS. TRAINED VOLUNTEERS THEN CONTACTED VICTIMS TO PROVIDE AN EMOTIONAL OUTLET AND TO GIVE ADVICE ON CLAIMS FOR RESTITUTION. IN THE FIRST 6 MONTHS OF OPERATION, THE BRISTOL SCHEME RECEIVED 926 REFERRALS, MADE CONTACT WITH 446, AND SUBSTANTIALLY AIDED IN 315 CASES. INFORMATION OBTAINED FROM THESE VICTIMS SHOWED THAT 102 HAD SUFFERED SOME EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE RANGING IN DEGREE FROM MAXIMUM TO MODERATE. OLDER WOMEN LIVING ALONE WERE VICTIMIZED MOST FREQUENTLY. TODAY THERE ARE 25 SUCH PROGRAMS IN OPERATION IN PLACES SUCH AS IN ISLINGTON, CHESHIRE, AND LIVERPOOL. INITIAL ANTAGONISMS FROM POLICE OFFICERS TOWARDS THE PROGRAM HAS LESSENED GREATLY AND REFERRAL RATES HAVE RISEN. PROGRAM SUCCESS DEPENDS UPON EXISTING NEED IN THE AREAS, PROVISION OF ADEQUATE FUNDING, COMPREHENSIVE VOLUNTEER TRAINING, APPROPRIATE SELECTION OF THE POLICE LIAISON OFFICER, AND AVAILABILITY OF A PANEL OF EXPERTS, SUCH AS LEGAL ADVISORS, TO ASSIST. VICTIM SUPPORT SCHEMES WILL PROBABLY BECOME INCREASINGLY IMPORTANT IN URBAN AREAS. AN APPENDIX LISTS NAMES OF VICTIM SUPPORT PROGRAM ADMINISTRATORS AND ADDRESSES.
Index Term(s): England; Victim program implementation; Victim services; Volunteer programs; Wales
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=62521

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