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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 62635 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: CRIME REPORTING - TOWARD A SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL MODEL
Journal: CRIMINOLOGY  Volume:17  Issue:3  Dated:(NOVEMBER 1979)  Pages:380-394
Author(s): R KIDD
Corporate Author: Sage Publications, Inc
United States of America
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 15
Sponsoring Agency: Sage Publications, Inc
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
US Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare
Rockville, MD 20857
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THIS ARTICLE OUTLINES A MODEL OF THE SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES INVOLVED IN CRIME REPORTING AND INTEGRATES THEM INTO A COHERENT THEORETICAL SCHEME.
Abstract: THE PROCESSES UNDERLYING THE REPORTING OF AN OBSERVED CRIME ASSUMES THAT BYSTANDERS ARE RATIONAL DECISIONMAKERS. AFTER SIGHTING AN UNUSUAL EVENT, THEY CALCULATE HOW DISCREPANT THE EVENT IS FROM PERSONAL NORMS, PONDER THE SORT OF LABEL THAT IS APPROPRIATE FOR EXPLAINING THE EVENT, ASSUME PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY, AND ADD UP THE COSTS AND BENEFITS ASSOCIATED WITH ACTION. FINAL ACTION OR INACTION, THEREFORE, IS THE CONSEQUENCE OF A LONG CHAIN OF UNOBSERVABLE, COGNITIVE EVENTS. THIS ANALYSIS, HOWEVER, DOES NOT ALWAYS GUARANTEE THAT OBSERVERS WATCHING A CRIME WILL BE LOGICAL AND RATIONAL, OR EVEN THAT THEIR ULTIMATE ACTION WILL BE THE PRODUCT OF ANY DECISIONMAKING PROCESS. EMOTIONAL CONSIDERATIONS MAY INTERVENE AND OVERRIDE COGNITIVE FACTORS, SUCH AS THE FEAR OF CONFRONTING POLICE WHICH COULD INFLUENCE THE REPORTING OF EVEN A SERIOUS CRIME. THE MODEL DRAWS HEAVILY FROM CURRENT THEORIZING IN STUDIES OF HELP GIVING AND ALTRUISTIC BEHAVIOR. REFERENCES ARE GIVEN. (MJW)
Index Term(s): Citizen crime reporting; Crime detection; Crime prevention measures; Psychological research; Social psychology
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=62635

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