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NCJ Number: 63036 Find in a Library
Title: BARGAIN WITH TERRORISTS?
Journal: NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE  Dated:(JULY 18, 1976)  Pages:7,38-40,42
Author(s): J MILLER
Corporate Author: New York Times
United States of America
Date Published: 1976
Page Count: 5
Sponsoring Agency: New York Times
New York, NY 10036
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: IN VIEW OF THE CURRENT U.S. POLICY OF NONNEGOTIATION WITH TERRORISTS, THIS ARTICLE EXAMINES THE HISTORY AND CURRENT DEBATE OVER THIS POLICY'S DETERRENT VALUE.
Abstract: FOLLOWING THE KILLING OF ISRAELI ATHLETES AT THE 1972 OLYMPICS, PRESIDENT NIXON ESTABLISHED THE CABINET COMMITTEE TO COMBAT TERRORISM THAT DEVELOPED THE CURRENT NO-CONCESSIONS POLICY. THE POLICY RECEIVED ITS FIRST TEST IN THE 1973 SEIZURE OF AMERICAN DIPLOMATS IN THE SUDAN BY RADICAL PALESTINIANS. THE DEATH OF TWO AMERICANS IN THAT INCIDENT PROMPTED CRITICISM OF THE POLICY AND AS DID A RAND CORPORATION STUDY LED BY BRIAN JENKINS. JENKINS CHALLENGES THE ASSUMPTIONS THAT REFUSAL TO NEGOTIATE DETERS TERRORISM AND THAT CHANGING THIS POLICY WOULD FOSTER ITS GROWTH. HE ARGUES THAT ALTHOUGH TERRORISM HAS MANY GOALS, SUCH AS PUBLICITY, MASS MURDER IS NOT ONE OF THEM. DATA ON U.S. KIDNAPPINGS INDICATE THAT DETERMINED ACTION TO CAPTURE AND CONVICT TERRORISTS, OR STRONG SANCTIONS AGAINST GOVERNMENTS SUPPORTING THEM, WOULD BE MORE EFFECTIVE DETERRENTS THAN THE CURRENT POLICY. IN ADDITION, THE REPORT ARGUES THAT HIGH LEVEL OFFICIALS SHOULD KEEP SILENT DURING TERRORIST EPISODES; THAT ANY INFORMATION TO THE PRESS SHOULD BE SCREENED; AND THAT THE GOVERNMENT'S WORKING GROUP SHOULD USE EXPERTS SUCH AS PSYCHIATRISTS, POLICE SPECIALISTS, AND OTHERS EXPERIENCED IN COERCIVE BARGAINING. CONVERSELY, STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIALS ARGUE THAT THE CURRENT POLICY HAS DETERRED SOME DIPLOMATIC KIDNAPPINGS, THAT OTHER GOVERNMENTS ARE ADOPTING SIMILAR POLICIES, AND THAT THE POLICY SOMETIMES HELPS THE VICTIM BARGAIN WITH KIDNAPPERS. A POSSIBLE APPROACH THAT MIGHT SATISFY BOTH SIDES WOULD BE TO CONTINUE A PUBLIC HARDLINE POLICY WHILE BECOMING MORE FLEXIBLE PRIVATELY. SOME PHOTOGRAPHS ARE INCLUDED. (CFW)
Index Term(s): Crisis management; Deterrence; Emergency procedures; International cooperation; Policy analysis; Terrorist kidnapping; Terrorist tactics; US Department of State
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=63036

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