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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 63276 Find in a Library
Title: PRISON EDUCATION TWO - THE TEACHER'S ROLE
Journal: EDUCATIONAL MAGAZINE  Volume:35  Issue:1  Dated:(1978)  Pages:3-11
Author(s): ANON
Corporate Author: Victoria Dept of Education
Publications Branch
Australia
Date Published: 1978
Page Count: 9
Sponsoring Agency: Victoria Dept of Education
Carlton, Victoria 3053, Australia
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: Australia
Annotation: TEACHERS IN AUSTRALIAN PRISONS DISCUSS THEIR RESPONSIBILITIES, PROBLEMS, AND EDUCATIONAL GOALS.
Abstract: MANY TEACHERS WOULD LIKE PRISON EDUCATION TO INCLUDE JOB HUNTING SKILLS, AND PROVIDE MORE VOCATIONAL TRAINING AND PRERELEASE PROGRAMS. IMPROVED SUPPORT SERVICES FOR RELEASED PRISONERS HAVE ALSO BEEN RECOMMENDED. EDUCATION IS NOT COMPULSORY FOR PRISONERS AND IS HELD IN LOW ESTEEM BY MANY INMATES. TEACHERS TRY TO SCREEN OUT STUDENTS WHO ARE NOT MOTIVATED, BUT CHOSE SCHOOL AS AN EASY ALTERNATIVE TO A PRISON JOB. DISCIPLINARY PROBLEMS ARE ALMOST UNKNOWN, BUT TEACHERS ENCOUNTER A RIGID SOCIAL STRUCTURE AMONG PRISONERS BASED ON CRIMINAL HISTORIES AND OFFENSES COMMITTED. EDUCATION IS HINDERED BY THE VARYING SENTENCES OFF PRISONERS AND THEIR FREQUENT TRANSFERS BETWEEN INSTITUTIONS. PRISON INDUSTRIES USUALLY DO NOT CONFLICT WITH THE EDUCATION PROGRAM, ALTHOUGH THEY OFTEN FAIL TO PROVIDE GENUINE VOCATIONAL TRAINING. SOME EXCEPTIONS HAVE INCLUDED A WELDING SHOP, A CATTLE FARM, AND LABOR DONATED TO COMMUNITY ENTERPRISES. TEACHERS ARE ALWAYS STRIVING TO MAINTAIN THE DELICATE BALANCE BETWEEN COOPERATING WITH PRISON AUTHORITIES AND GAINING THE TRUST OF THE INMATES. RELATIONS BETWEEN TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATORS HAVE BEEN IMPROVING STEADILY AND IN SOME PRISONS EDUCATORS HAVE BEEN INCLUDED IN MANAGEMENT TEAMS. TEACHERS HAVE ESTABLISHED CLOSE CONTACTS WITH WELFARE OFFICERS, AND MANY PROFESSONALS FEEL THAT THE RELATIONSHIP SHOULD BE INSTITUTIONALIZED. PRISON EDUCATORS ARE UNCERTAIN ABOUT THEIR REHABILITATIVE ROLE BUT FEEL THEY CAN CONTRIBUTE TO THE SOCIALIZATION AND PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT OF STUDENTS. MOST TRY TO CREATE A CONGENIAL AND INFORMAL ATMOSPHERE IN THE INSTITUTIONAL SETTING. THE AMOUNT OF COUNSELING A TEACHER SUPPLIES DEPENDS ON THE INDIVIDUAL, ALTHOUGH SOME THINK THAT EMOTIONAL INVOLVMENT SHOULD BE AVOIDED. CASE HISTORIES OF PRISONERS WHOSE RECIDIVISM CYCLES WERE BROKEN BY EDUCATION ARE PRESENTED. (MJM)
Index Term(s): Australia; Correctional industries; Counseling; Educators; Inmate academic education; Inmate vocational training; Prerelease programs
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=63276

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