skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 64515 Find in a Library
Title: MODEL FOR PRISON EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND GUIDELINES FOR THEIR OPERATION
Journal: JOURNAL OF CORRECTIONAL EDUCATION  Volume:30  Issue:1  Dated:(1979)  Pages:3-8
Author(s): J D AYERS
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 6
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: PRINCIPLES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF PRISONER EDUCATION ARE PRESENTED, BASED ON STUDENT EVALUATIONS OF PRISON EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS IN GREAT BRITAIN, CANADA, AND THE UNITED STATES.
Abstract: THE EVALUATIONS OF PRISON EDUCATION PROGRAMS WERE CONDUCTED IN SELECTED PRISONS (THE NUMBER OF PRISONS SURVEYED IS NOT GIVEN) IN THE THREE COUNTRIES, USING THE SAME QUESTIONS IN INTERVIEWS WITH INMATE STUDENTS DURING 1974-75. FINDINGS SHOW THAT THE BENEFICIAL EFFECTS OF UNIVERSITY LEVEL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE COURSES ARE REAL AND LONG-TERM, BASED ON FOLLOWUP FROM THE INTERVIEWS. WHEREVER SCHOOLING WAS PART-TIME, EVENING OR DAY, THE MAJORITY OF STUDENTS PROPOSED LONGER HOURS OR MORE SESSIONS. THE USE OF PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION AND INDIVIDUALLY PRESCRIBED INSTRUCTION MATERIALS AS THE PRIMARY MEANS OF INSTRUCTION IS SEVERELY CRITICIZED AS BEING EGO THREATENING AND DISCOURAGING. COMPULSORY PROGRAMS OR GROUP COUNSELING SESSIONS WERE GENERALLY CONSIDERED TO BE INEFFECTIVE. BASED UPON THE FINDINGS, PRISON EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS SHOULD BE DESIGNED TO MEET PRISONER NEEDS ON A BROAD RANGE OF LEVELS. GENERALLY, PROGRAMS SHOULD BE DESIGNED TO MEET PRISONER NEEDS ON A BROAD RANGE OF LEVELS. GENERALLY, PROGRAMS SHOULD BE PROVIDED AT FOUR LEVELS: (1) LITERACY (GRADES ONE TO FIVE); (2) BASIC SKILL DEVELOPMENT (GRADES SIX TO NINE); (3) COLLEGE PREPARATORY (GRADES 10 TO 12); AND (4) POSTSECONDARY, COLLEGE, AND UNIVERSITY. COURSES SHOULD BE AS SHORT AS IS EDUCATIONALLY DEFENSIBLE, BECAUSE LEARNING IS PROMOTED BY KNOWLEDGE OF RESULTS AND FORMAL RECOGNITION OF PROGRESS. PROGRAMS AT ALL LEVELS CAN BE IMPROVED BY HAVING A CORE OF HUMANITIES COURSES; THEY PROVIDE A GENERAL EDUCATION THAT MOST INMATES HAVE MISSED BECAUSE OF EARLY SCHOOL DROUPOUT. THE APPENDIX DESCRIBES THE EDUCATIONAL SURVEY IN CANADA. REFERENCES ARE PROVIDED. (RCB)
Index Term(s): Canada; Curriculum; Educational courses; Great Britain/United Kingdom; Inmate academic education; Surveys; United States of America
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=64515

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.