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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 64594 Find in a Library
Title: POLICE, SOCIAL WORKERS AND CHILDREN IN TROUBLE - A STUDY IN LIAISON
Journal: JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WELFARE LAW  Volume:1979  Issue:3  Dated:(1979)  Pages:147-154
Author(s): N SHONE; R CHRISTIE
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 8
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United Kingdom
Annotation: A SPECIAL UNIT OF SOCIAL WORK TEACHERS AND STUDENTS TESTED METHODS OF WORKING WITH FAMILIES AND DELINQUENTS REFERRED BY THE POLICE IN CHESIRE, ENGLAND.
Abstract: THE 1969 CHILDREN AND YOUNG PERSONS ACT WAS INTRODUCED TO COPE WITH DELINQUENTS OUTSIDE OF COURT AND PREVENT THEM FROM DEVELOPING INTO ADULT CRIMINALS. THE PROJECT EXAMINED BOTH THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE LAW AND THE SPECIAL PROBLEMS OF WIDNES, A TOWN IN CHESHIRE WHICH HAD A HIGH PROPORTION OF CHILDREN IN COURT AND LACKED SOCIAL SERVICES. TEACHERS FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LIVERPOOL DEVISED A PROGRAM TO OPERATE WITHIN THE CHESHIRE SOCIAL SERVICES, EDUCATE SOCIAL WORK STUDENTS, AND STUDY DELINQUENCY. TRADITIONALLY POLICE HAVE USED CAUTIONARY PROCEDURES TO KEEP CHILDREN OUT OF COURT, AND SOCIAL WORKERS HAVE NOT BEEN GIVEN MUCH RESPONSIBILITY FOR HELPING JUVENILES STAY OUT OF TROUBLE. BEGINNING IN 1975, THE UNIVERSITY TEAM HANDLED ALL CASES OF CHILDREN UNDER 14 WHO HAD BEEN REFERRED TO THE SOCIAL SERVICES BY THE POLICE FOR THE FIRST TIME BECAUSE OF CRIME OR FOR PROTECTIVE REASONS. SOCIAL WORKERS VISITED EVERY FAMILY TO ASSESS THEIR CAPACITY TO COPE WITH THE CHILD'S BEHAVIOR AND IDENTIFY THOSE NEEDING PROFESSIONAL HELP. WEEKLY MEETINGS WERE HELD WITH POLICE OFFICERS TO DISCUSS BOUNDARIES OF RESPONSIBILITY, SCHEDULES FOR SOCIAL WORKERS TO REPORT BACK TO THE POLICE, AND METHODS FOR HANDLING JUVENILES. OVER A 3-YEAR PERIOD, COOPERATION BETWEEN THE POLICE AND THE SOCIAL SERVICES INCREASED, AND POLICE BEGAN TO DELEGATE THEIR COUNSELOR ROLES TO THE SOCIAL WORKERS. THE PROJECT ESTABLISHED A SYSTEMATIC PROCEDURE FOR DIAGNOSIS OF A CHILD BEFORE A DECISION WAS MADE REGARDING A COURT APPEARANCE, DEVELOPED TREATMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN THE COMMUNITY, AND INVOLVED THE SCHOOLS WHEN POSSIBLE. POLICE AND UNIVERSITY STUDENTS COOPERATED IN SETTING UP A VOLUNTEER PROGRAM TO WORK WITH CHILDREN WHO HAD BEEN CAUTIONED. THE SOCIAL WORKER'S ASSESSMENTS ALSO ASSISTED THE COURT IN ORDERING TREATMENT. FOOTNOTES ARE PROVIDED. (MJM)
Index Term(s): England; Interagency cooperation; Juvenile court diversion; Juvenile court intake; Police juvenile relations; Social service agencies; Social workers
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=64594

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