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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 65175 Find in a Library
Title: POLICE OFFICER AS STREET PSYCHIATRIST
Journal: POLICE STUDIES  Volume:2  Issue:3  Dated:(FALL 1979)  Pages:27-31
Author(s): S S JANUS; B E BESS; J CADDEN; H GREENWALD
Corporate Author: John Jay Press
United States of America
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 5
Sponsoring Agency: John Jay Press
New York, NY 10019
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THE IMPACT OF SHORT-TERM, INTENSIVE INSTRUCTION BY PSYCHOLOGISTS AND PSYCHIATRISTS ON POLICE ATTITUDES TOWARD THE MENTALLY ILL AND ON THEIR ABILITY TO RECOGNIZE BEHAVIORS OF THE MENTALLY ILL IS ASSESSED.
Abstract: ADDRESSING THE EMOTIONAL NEEDS OF CITIZENS WHO CALL FOR POLICE TO INTERVENE IN THEIR CONFLICTS AMD POLICE PROBLEMS IN COLLABORATING AND CONSULTING WITH THE PSYCHIATRIC PROFESSION, THE STUDY INVOLVED AN EXPERIMENTAL GROUP OF 80 POLICE OFFICERS ENROLLED IN A MANDATORY PSYCHOLOGY COURSE. A CONTROL GROUP OF 80 OTHERS WAS GIVEN NO ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTION BEYOND THE NORMAL COURSE WORK. THE EXPERIMENTAL GROUP WAS INSTRUCTED IN ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY, PSYCHIATRIC DESCRIPTION, AND SYNDROMES DURING 16 HOURS OF LECTURES, FILMS, AND RELEVANT CASE MATERIAL. BOTH GROUPS WERE THEN TESTED TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE INSTRUCTION ON A CONCRETE BASIS; A FILM SHOWING BIZARRE-BEHAVING PSYCHOTIC PATIENTS WAS THE TOOL FOR ASSESSMENT. THE OFFICERS WERE TO TREAT THE FILM AS AN INCIDENT TO WHICH THEY HAD BEEN CALLED IN THE LINE OF DUTY AND TO DESCRIBE THE SCENE TO PROVIDE PSYCHIATRISTS WITH INFORMATION FOR MAKING HOSPITALIZATION DECISIONS. THE RESULTS SHOWED THAT THE EXPERIMENTAL GROUP HAD LEARNED TO RECOGNIZE PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND REPORT IT CORRECTLY. MOREOVER, EVEN ITEMS FROM STANDARD POLICE REPORTS, SUCH AS IDENTIFICATION AND APPEARANCE, WERE BETTER RECORDED BY THE EXPERIMENTAL GROUP. THEY TREATED THE CASES FAR MORE SERIOUSLY, WITHOUT RIDICULE OR ANXIETY ABOUT DEALING WITH PSYCHIATRIC PROBLEMS. QUOTATONS INCLUDED FROM THE TEST DEMONSTRATE EMPATHY ON THE PART OF EXPERIMENTAL GROUP RESPONDENTS AND DEROGATORY TERMINOLOGY AND A LACK OF UNDERSTANDING FROM THE CONTROL GROUP. CONFIDENCE IN THEIR WORK AND IN CONTACTS WITH THE MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONS WERE AFFIRMED BY THOSE WHO TOOK PART IN THE EXPERIMENTAL INSTRUCTION. NOTES ARE INCLUDED. (MRK)
Index Term(s): Behavioral science training; Mental disorders; Mentally ill offenders; Police attitudes; Police effectiveness; Police training for persons with disabilities; Psychiatry; Psychology
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=65175

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