skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 65325 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: AREA SAMPLING TECHNIQUE APPLIED TO CRIMINAL VICTIM SURVEYS
Author(s): T G BIRTLES
Date Published: 1978
Page Count: 95
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: Australia
Annotation: THIS STUDY INVESTIGATED THE RESULTS OF APPLYING A GEOGRAPHICAL SAMPLING TECHNIQUE TO A VICTIM SURVEY OF RESIDENTIAL AREAS IN A LARGE TOWN.
Abstract: INFORMATION WAS GATHERED FROM VICTIMS OF UNREPORTED OFFENSES AS WELL AS FROM VICTIMS WHO DID REPORT. IN ADDITION, VARIATIONS IN THE PERCEPTION OF CRIME WERE ASSESSED ACCORDING TO WHETHER A RESPONDENT HAS BEEN THE VICTIM OF A CRIME OR LIVES IN A CERTAIN TYPE OF NEIGHBORHOOD. BY THE SELECTION OF SMALLER SAMPLE AREAS, IT WAS HOPED THAT CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL ANND ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES RELATED TO VICTIMIZATION AND THE PERCEPTION OF CRIME MIGHT BE REVEALED IN A WAY NOT POSSIBLE IN A NATIONAL OR CITY SURVEY. FIFTEEN SAMPLE AREAS OF CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND, WERE SELECTED, AND QUESTIONNAIRES WERE SENT TO ONE-THIRD OF THE HOUSEHOLDS IN EACH. QUESTIONNAIRES WERE RETURNED FROM 280 HOUSEHOLDS, A 10-PERCENT RESPONSE. ONE-THIRD OF THE RESPONDENTS WROTE ADDITIONAL COMMENTS, INDICATING THAT THE QUESTIONNAIRE ACTED AS AN OUTLET FOR THE EXPRESSION OF SUPPRESSED EMOTIONS ON MATTERS RELATING TO CRIME. INFORMATION FROM THE QUESTIONNAIRES WAS CODED ACCORDING TO 76 VARIABLES FOR WHICH FREQUENCY TABLES WERE PRODUCED AND CROSS TABULATIONS MADE. THERE WAS AN OVERALL BIAS IMPLYING THAT REPLIES REFLECTED INADEQUATE COVERAGE OF THE OPINIONS OF FEMALES, PERSONS UNDER 30, TWO-MEMBER HOUSEHOLDS, UNSKILLED AND SKILLED MANUAL WORKERS, AND TENANTS OF PRIVATELY OWNED BUILDINGS. RESPONDENTS IN SEVERAL AREAS CITED BURGLARY RISK AND VANDALISM AS RESIDENTIAL DISADVANTAGES. RESPONSES INDICATED THAT AT LEAST ONE SIX HOUSEHOLDS HAD A MEMBER WHO WAS VICTIM OF AN OFFENSE DURING 1976 AND THAT ABOUT ONE IN EVERY FIVE VICTIMS DID NOT SEEK POLICE ASSISTANCE. ASSAULTS WERE THE MOST COMMON TYPES OF CRIMES, FOLLOWED BY THEFT. THE SIZE OF VICTIM RESPONSE WAS TOO SMALL TO DETERMINE DISTINCT GEOGRAPHICAL PATTERNS FOR TYPES OF OFFENSES. RESIDENTS THOUGHT CRIME WAS ON THE INCREASE, THEY STEREOTYPED BURGLARS AS LOCAL RESIDENTS, AND THEY BELIEVED YOUTH AND HABITUAL ADULT OFFENDERS WERE THOSE MOST LIKELY TO COMMIT CRIMES. MOST RESPONDENTS WERE IN FAVOR OF VICTIM COMPENSATION. REFERENCES AND APPENDIXES ARE INCLUDED. (MRK)
Index Term(s): Crime patterns; England; Estimated crime incidence; Fear of crime; Public Attitudes/Opinion; Societal reactions to crime; Victim reactions to crime; Victimization surveys
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=65325

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.