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NCJ Number: 65756 Find in a Library
Title: HOW SERIOUS A CRIME? PERCEPTIONS OF ORGANIZATIONAL AND COMMON CRIMES (FROM WHITE-COLLAR CRIME - THEORY AND RESEARCH, 1980, BY GILBERT GEIS AND EZRA STOTLAND SEE NCJ-65757)
Author(s): L S SCHRAGER; J F SHORT
Corporate Author: Sage Publications, Inc
United States of America
Date Published: 1980
Page Count: 18
Sponsoring Agency: Sage Publications, Inc
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: USING DATA FROM A SURVEY OF PUBLIC PERCEPTIONS ON THE SERIOUSNESS OF A VARIETY OF WHITE-COLLAR AND 'STREET' CRIMES, THE ASSUMPTION OF PUBLIC INDIFFERENCE TOWARD WHITE-COLLAR CRIMES IS EXAMINED.
Abstract: DATA WERE DERIVED FROM A SURVEY OF PREDOMINANTLY WHITE AND BLACK CENSUS TRACTS IN BALTIMORE, MD., WHICH WERE SEPARATELY STRATIFIED INTO THREE GROUPS ON THE BASIS OF MEDIAN INCOME; ONE TRACT WAS RANDOMLY CHOSEN FROM EACH INCOME GROUP FOR WHITES AND TWO TRACTS FROM EACH INCOME CATEGORY FOR BLACKS. THE INTERVIEW CONSISTED OF QUESTIONS ON VICTIMIZATION DURING THE PREVIOUS YEAR, RESPONDENT BACKGROUND CHARACTERISTICS, AND A RATING OF SEVERITY FOR 80 CRIMES. EACH CRIME WAS SORTED INTO ONE OF NINE CATEGORIES ON A CONTINUUM FROM MOST TO LEAST SERIOUS, BASED UPON ECONOMIC AND PHYSICALLY INJURIOUS IMPACTS OF THE OFFENSE. RESULTS SHOW THAT THE PUBLIC TENDS TO EVALUATE BOTH 'STREET' AND ORGANIZATIONAL OFFENSES IN TERMS OF IMPACT. BOTH ORGANIZATIONAL OFFENSES AND 'STREET' OFFENSES RESULTING IN DEATH FOR VICTIMS WERE VIEWED WITH EQUAL SERIOUSNESS. THE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF ORGANIZATIONAL AND 'STREET' CRIME, VIEWED WITH THE SAME DEGREE OF SERIOUSNESS, WERE ALSO SEEN AS LESS SERIOUS THAN OFFENSES INVOLVING PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH. THUS, STUDIES CLAIMING PUBLIC INDIFFERENCE TOWARD ORGANIZATIONAL OFFENSES ARE NOT SUBSTANTIATED. FINDINGS IMPLY STRONG PUBLIC SUPPORT FOR THE SETTING OF ORGANIZATIONAL REGULATORY SANCTIONS IN PROPORTION TO THE SERIOUSNESS OF VIOLATION IMPACTS. SUGGESTIONS ARE OFFERED FOR FURTHER RESEARCH. TABULAR DATA, NOTES, AND REFERENCES ARE PROVIDED. (RCB)
Index Term(s): Maryland; Offense classification; Organized crime; Public Attitudes/Opinion; Street crimes; Surveys; White collar crime
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=65756

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