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NCJ Number: 65903 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: POLICE PATROL WORK - A COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE (FROM POLICE BEHAVIOR - A SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE, 1980, BY RICHARD J LUNDMAN - SEE NCJ-65902)
Author(s): R J LUNDMAN
Corporate Author: Oxford University Press, Inc
United States of America
Date Published: 1980
Page Count: 14
Sponsoring Agency: Oxford University Press, Inc
New York, NY 10016
US Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare
Washington, DC 20203
Grant Number: RO1 MH17917-02
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THIS STUDY OF POLICE PATROL WORK IN FIVE DIFFERENT JURISDICTIONS SUGGESTS THAT THE EXPENSE OF ROUTINE PATROL AND PERSONNEL CANNOT BE JUSTIFIED ON GROUNDS OF THE DETECTION OF SERIOUS CRIMES OR SUSPECT APPREHENSION.
Abstract: A QUANTITATIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY WAS MADE OF POLICE IN A CITY OF MORE THAN 500,000, IN TWO SUBURBS OF THAT CITY, AND IN TWO OTHER JURISDICTIONS AND AN EASTERN TOWNSHIP SERVING AN URBAN AREA. OBSERVERS, TRAINED OVER 3 MONTHS, TRAVELED WITH POLICE ON A RANDOM-TIME SAMPLE BASIS RECORDING DATA ON ELECTRONIC CODING EQUIPMENT. PROBLEMS PATROL OFFICERS ENCOUNTERED IN EACH OF THESE FIVE DEPARTMENTS WERE CODED INTO ONE OF SIX CATEGORIES: PUBLIC INFORMATION (CALLS ABOUT A CRIMINAL INCIDENT, MISSING PERSON, ETC.); SERVICE CALLS (ACCIDENTS, LOCK-OUTS, ASSISTANCE); ORDER MAINTENANCE (DISTURBANCE OF THE PEACE); LAW ENFORCEMENT (SERIOUS OFFENSES OR CRIMES); TRAFFIC; AND OTHER (MISCELLANEOUS PROBLEMS). RESULTS SHOWED THAT THE MOST FREQUENT TYPE OF ACTIVITY OVERALL WAS LAW ENFORCEMENT. URBAN POLICE DEALT WITH MORE CRIMINAL INCIDENTS THAN DID SUBURBAN AND STATE POLICE. ORDER MAINTENANCE ALSO OCCUPIED A SIGNIFICANT PROPORTION OF POLICE PATROL TIME. MOVING AND PARKING VIOLATIONS WERE THE THIRD MOST FREQUENT PROBLEM AND WERE ESPECIALLY HEAVY IN SUBURBAN POLICE PATROLS. SERVICE ENCOUNTERS, THE FOURTH MOST FREQUENT TYPE OF ACTIVITY, WERE NEARLY EQUAL IN ALL DEPARTMENTS STUDIED. INFORMATION-GATHERING ACTIVITIES WERE INFREQUENT IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. URBAN DEPARTMENTS WERE MORE FREQUENTLY INVOLVED IN CRIMINAL INCIDENTS, AND DEPARTMENTAL POLICIES SOMETIMES DIFFERED. ALL DEPARTMENTS WERE HIGHLY DEPENDENT ON CITIZEN INPUT (CITIZEN REPORTS OF CRIMINAL INCIDENTS). IT IS SUGGESTED THAT ROUTINE PATROL DOES NOT HAVE A DETERRENT EFFECT ON CRIME AND THAT A REVIEW OF DEPARTMENTAL POLICES IN THE AREAS OF TRAFFIC VIOLATION AND PROVISION OF SERVICES TO CITIZENS IS SUGGESTED. TABULAR DATA AND NOTES ARE INCLUDED. (MJW)
Index Term(s): Foot patrol; Motor patrol; Municipal police; Patrol; Police command and control; Police community relations; Police crime-prevention; Police effectiveness; Sociology
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