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NCJ Number: 65913 Find in a Library
Title: TRAINING POLICE IN THE MANAGEMENT OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Journal: CANADIAN POLICE COLLEGE JOURNAL  Volume:3  Issue:4  Dated:(1979)  Pages:305-315
Author(s): G L BELL
Corporate Author: Canadian Police College Journal
Canada
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 11
Sponsoring Agency: Canadian Police College Journal
Ottawa, Ontario K1G 3J2, Canada
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: Canada
Annotation: THIS ARTICLE PRESENTS THE RATIONALE AND THE OUTLINE OF A PROGRAM TO TRAIN POLICE IN DOMESTIC VIOLENCE. ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE (RCMP) ARE CURRENTLY RECEIVING SUCH TRAINING.
Abstract: AS A RESULT OF THE GROWING WORLDWIDE PROBLEM OF FAMILY VIOLENCE, THERE IS NEED FOR POLICE TO RESPOND MORE EFFECTIVELY AND SAFELY WHEN CALLED TO INTERVENE. THE FBI REPORTS THAT 20 PERCENT OF U.S. PATROL OFFICERS WHO ARE KILLED ON DUTY ARE KILLED DURING SUCH INTERVENTIONS. DURING THE 9-YEAR PERIOD ENDING IN 1979, APPROXIMATELY 7,000 RCMP OFFICERS RECEIVED TRAINING IN THE MANAGEMENT OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE. IN THE U.S., POLICE FAMILY VIOLENCE TRAINING PROGRAMS BEGAN ONLY AFTER 1966 IN ORDER TO PROMOTE OFFICER SAFETY, TO RESPOND TO A PUBLIC OUTCRY FOR DOMESTIC INTERVENTION, TO PREVENT VIOLENCE, AND TO ALERT POLICE TO THEIR ROLES AS HELPERS. ALTHOUGH FAMILY VIOLENCE PROGRAMS MAY TRAIN ALL PATROLMEN OR ONLY A SPECIAL GROUP, IT IS MORE ADVISABLE TO PROVIDE SUCH TRAINING TO ALL POLICE PERSONNEL. TRAINING AND TEACHING MAY BE DONE BY POLICE PERSONNEL, SOCIAL SCIENTISTS, OR BOTH. THREE DIFFERENT INTERVENTION APPROACHES MAY BE TAUGHT: THE ASSERTION OF AUTHORITY, NEGOTIATION, AND COUNSELING. MOST POLICE OFFICERS VIEW NEGOTIATION AS THE MOST USEFUL SKILL TO BE LEARNED FOR CONFLICT MANAGEMENT. BOTH PEACEKEEPING AND COUNSELING OBJECTIVES CAN BE EMBRACED BY VIEWING THE CRISIS INTERVENTION PROCESS AS CONSISTING OF THREE CRITICAL PHASES: (1) CONTROL, (2) DIFFUSION (DE-ESCALATION), AND (3) PROBLEMSOLVING. NEW APPROACHES TO TEACHING CRISIS INTERVENTION ARE ALSO NEEDED, HOWEVER, SINCE GOOD INTERPERSONAL SKILLS ARE NOT BEST TAUGHT IN THE CLASSROOM. SIMULATED DOMESTIC VIOLENCE EVENTS ARE SUGGESTED. REFERENCES AND FOOTNOTES ARE INCLUDED. (PAP)
Index Term(s): Canada; Crisis intervention training; Domestic assault; Family crisis intervention units; Family crisis training; Foreign police training; Police effectiveness; Police safety; Role perception
Note: PAPER PREPARED FOR THE CANADIAN POLICE COLLEGE RELATIONS WORKSHOP, JUNE 1979
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=65913

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