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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 65922 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF CRIME - PROFILING
Journal: FBI LAW ENFORCEMENT BULLETIN  Volume:49  Issue:3  Dated:(MARCH 1980)  Pages:22-25
Author(s): R L AULT; J T REESE
Corporate Author: Federal Bureau of Investigation
US Dept of Justice
United States of America
Date Published: 1980
Page Count: 4
Sponsoring Agency: Federal Bureau of Investigation
Washington, DC 20535-0001
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Publisher: https://www.fbi.gov 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THIS INTRODUCTORY ARTICLE, THE FIRST OF A THREE-PART SERIES, IS INTEDED TO FAMILIARIZE THE LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER WITH THE CONCEPTS OF PROFILING AND THE USE OF PSYCHOLOGY AS ADDITIONAL CRIME-SOLVING TOOLS.
Abstract: DURING THE SUMMER OF 1979, A RAPE LED TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF A PSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE BY THE FBI ACADEMY'S BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE UNIT. THREE DAYS AFTER RECEIVING THE PROFILE, THE REQUESTING AGENCY DEVELOPED APPROXIMATELY 40 NEIGHBORHOOD SUSPECTS. USING ADDITIONAL PROFILE INFORMATION, THEY NARROWED THEIR INVESTIGATION TO ONE PERSON WHO WAS ARRESTED WITHIN THE WEEK. PROFILES ARE BASED ON THE PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF A CRIME SCENE WHERE CERTAIN ITEMS OF EVIDENCE ARE IDENTIFIED AND INTERPRETED TO INDICATE THE PERSONALITY TYPE OF THE INDIVIDUAL OR INDIVIDUALS COMMITTING THE CRIME. THE PROFILE ENABLES INVESTIGATORS TO LIMIT OR BETTER DIRECT THEIR INVESTIGATIONS BUT DOES NOT REPLACE SOUND INVESTIGATIVE PROCEDURES. PROFILING, DEVELOPED AS EARLY AS WORLD WAR II, WORKS IN HARMONY WITH THE SEARCH FOR PHYSICAL EVIDENCE. IT DERVICES FROM CURRENT BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE PRINCIPLES AND ASSUMES THAT A CRIME, PARTICULARLY A BIZARRE CRIME REFLECTS THE PERSONALITY CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PERPETRATOR. NECESSARY ITEMS FOR A PROFILE INCLUDE THE SURVIVING VICTIM'S RECONSTRUCTION OF EXACT CONVERSATIONS WITH THE PERPETRATOR, CRIME SCENE PHOTOGRAPHS, COMPLETED AUTOPSY PROTOCOL, AND A COMPLETE INCIDENT REPORT. IN ADDITION, THE PROFILER SEARCHES FOR THE MOTIVE AS PRIMARY PSYCHOLOGICAL EVIDENCE. PROFILES SHOULD BE CONFINED CHIEFLY TO CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON WHERE THE MOTIVE IS LACKING AND WHERE EVIDENCE OF PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AT THE CRIME SCENE EXISTS. AN AGENCY REQUESTING A PSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE SHOULD CONTACT THE FBI FIELD OFFICE WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT TERRITORY. FOOTNOTES ARE GIVEN. (AOP)
Index Term(s): Behavior patterns; Behavioral science research; Crime Scene Investigation; Criminal methods; FBI National Academy; Psychological research; Psychology
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=65922

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