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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 66212 Find in a Library
Title: MANAGEMENT CONTROL THROUGH MOTIVATION
Journal: FBI LAW ENFORCEMENT BULLETIN  Volume:49  Issue:2  Dated:(FEBRUARY 1980)  Pages:6-11
Author(s): D C WITHAM
Corporate Author: Federal Bureau of Investigation
US Dept of Justice
United States of America
Date Published: 1980
Page Count: 6
Sponsoring Agency: Federal Bureau of Investigation
Washington, DC 20535-0001
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Document: PDF
Publisher: https://www.fbi.gov 
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: TRADITIONAL POLICE MANAGEMENT CONTROL STRATEGIES ARE DISCUSSED AS ARE THE EFFECTS OF THE STRATEGIES ON BEHAVIOR AND ON MOTIVATION.
Abstract: AS POLICE DEPARTMENTS BECOME COMPLEX, THE NEED FOR POLICIES AND PROCEDURES BECOMES MORE PRONOUNCED. HOWEVER, TOO MUCH DIRECTION CAN LEAD TO A LACK OF FLEXIBILITY AND OUTMODED AND IMPROPER POLICIES. THE CONTROL PROCESS OF MEASURING PERFORMANCE AND PROVIDING FEEDBACK SOMETIMES LEADS TO MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION ON WHAT IS QUANTIFIABLE AT THE EXPENSE OF THAT WHICH IS IMPORTANT. MOREOVER, PERFORMANCE MEASURES SELECTED FOR THE CONTROL SYSTEM CAN, IN FACT, CHANGE THE BEHAVIOR OF EMPLOYEES, AND IF THE MEASURES ARE NOT A VALID INDICATOR OF PERFORMANCE, THIS CHANGE IN BEHAVIOR MAY WELL BE DETRIMENTAL. RESEARCH STUDIES INDICATE THAT FEEDBACK EFFECTIVENESS CAN VARY, DEPENDING ON WHO OR WHAT PROVIDES IT. MOST INDIVIDUALS SEEM TO FIND THE TASK AND THEMSELVES THE PREFERRED SOURCE. KNOWLEDGE OF MOTIVATIONAL THEORY CAN ALSO BE APPLIED TO CONTROL PERSONNEL BEHAVIOR. THIS THEORY INCLUDES ABRAHAM MASLOW'S HIERARCHICAL RELATIONSHIPS OF NEEDS, AND FREDERICK HERZBERG'S TWO-FACTOR THEORY OF MOTIVATION IN WHICH A PERSON MUST BE GIVEN A MEANINGFUL AND CHALLENGING TASK TO PERFORM IN ORDER TO BE MOTIVATED. WHILE BOTH MODELS HAVE LED TO MIXED RESEARCH RESULTS AND CRITICISM, THEY HAVE PROVIDED ADDITIONAL UNDERSTANDING OF DIVERSE NEEDS OF PEOPLE, JOB-CONTENT FACTORS, AND WORKER SATISFACTION. IN ADDITION, EXPECTANCY THEORY, WHICH RECOGNIZES A COGNITIVE ASPECT TO BEHAVIOR, SUGGESTS THAT PEOPLE TRADE UPON THEIR EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE TO MAKE QUICK, SUBJECTIVE, ESTIMATES OF BEHAVIORAL PAYOFFS. BY DESIGNING AND ADMINISTERING THE REWARD PRACTICES (PAY, PROMOTIONS, ASSIGNMENTS) OF THE ORGANIZATION SO THAT THEY ARE OBVIOUS SUPERIOR PERFORMANCE REWARDS, POLICE MANAGERS CAN INCREASE THE PROBABILITY OF SATISFACTORY PERFORMANCE. CHARTS ARE INCLUDED. (AOP)
Index Term(s): Behavioral and Social Sciences; Motivation; Police management
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=66212

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