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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 66332 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION - EXPLORING THE DELINQUENCY PREVENTION POTENTIAL
Author(s): J D HAWKINS; J S WALL
Corporate Author: University of Washington
JD 45 National Ctr for the Assessment of Delinquent Behavior and Its
United States of Americ
Date Published: 1980
Page Count: 85
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
Superintendent of Documents, GPO
Washington, DC 20402
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
US Dept of Justice
Grant Number: 77-NI-99-0017
Sale Source: Superintendent of Documents, GPO
Washington, DC 20402
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Program/Project Evaluation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THIS PAPER INVESTIGATES ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION FOR DISRUPTIVE STUDENTS AS AN APPROACH TO DELINQUENCY PREVENTION BECAUSE SCHOOL-RELATED FACTORS HAVE BEEN FOUND TO AFFECT DELINQUENT BEHAVIOR.
Abstract: THESE SCHOOL RELATED FACTORS CAN INCLUDE ACADEMIC FAILURE, WEAK COMMITMENTS TO SCHOOL AND ACADEMIC EDUCATION (AS WELL AS CONFORMING MEMBERS OF THE SCHOOL COMMUNITY), AND ATTACHMENTS TO DELINQUENT CLASSMATES. HOWEVER THE SCHOOL EXPERIENCES CAN BE MINIMIZED BY ALTERING THE STRUCTURE OF THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS. SPECIFIC ELEMENTS TO BE CONTAINED IN ALTERNATIVE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS ARE INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION WITH CURRICULUMS TAILORED TO STUDENTS' INDIVIDUAL NEEDS AND A SYSTEM OF REWARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL IMPROVEMENTS. A GOAL-ORIENTED WORK AND LEARNING EMPHASIS SHOULD ALSO BE INCLUDED. A SMALL PROGRAM SIZE, LOW STUDENT-TEACHER RATIO, AND CARING, COMPETENT TEACHERS ARE NEEDED, AS IS A COMMITTED, SUPPORTIVE ADMINISTRATOR. ADDITIONAL ISSUES TO BE CONSIDERED INCLUDE POSSIBILITIES OF STUDENT AND PARENT INVOLVEMENT IN SCHOOL DECISIONMAKING, SUPPLEMENTAL SOCIAL SUPPORT SERVICES TO FACILITATE STUDENT ADJUSTMENT, VOCATIONALLY ORIENTED COMPONENTS, AND PEER COUNSELING. AMONG THE PITFALLS TO BE AVOIDED ARE STUDENT TRACKING AND RACIAL SEGREGATION IN SELECTING CLIENTS FOR THE ALTERNATIVE PROGRAM. THE LOCATION OF THE ALTERNATIVE PROGRAM SHOULD BE CAREFULLY WEIGHED. THE POSSIBILITIES INCLUDE FACILITIES SEPARATE FROM TRADITIONAL SCHOOLS, SCHOOLS WITHIN SCHOOLS, AND SCHOOLS WITHOUT WALLS, ALL OF WHICH HAVE SIGNIFICANT DRAWBACKS AND ADVANTAGES. THE MATCHING OF DIFFERENT LEARNING APPROACHES TO STUDENTS WITH DIFFERENT LEARNING STYLES AND ABILITIES MUST AVOID A SEGREGATION OF RACIAL AND LOW-INCOME MINORITIES. ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES FOR PRIMARY GRADE STUDENTS WITH ACADEMIC MODIFIED) BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS OFFER LONG-TERM PROMISE FOR FUTURE DELINQUENCY PREVENTION, BUT PLANNING FOR THESE MUST ALSO BE LONG RANGE, INVOLVING LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICT SUPPORT. A BROADER POLICY ISSUE IS THAT OF EFFECTING SYSTEMWIDE CHANGES IN TRADITIONAL SCHOOLS THAT WOULD PROVIDE LEARNING ALTERNATIVES FOR INDIVIDUALS, INCLUDING THOSE WITH BEHAVIOR AND LEARNING PROBLEMS. FINALLY EVALUATION GUIDELINES FOR ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS ARE PROVIDED INCLUDING PROCESS MONITORING TO DOCUMENT PROGRAM CONTEXT, STUDENT SELECTION PROCEDURES, AND THE EDUCATIONAL STRATEGIES USED. OUTCOME STUDIES SHOULD BE DONE WITH COMPARISON GROUPS, AND FOLLOWUPS SHOULD CONTINUE FOR AT LEAST TWICE AS LONG AS THE PROJECT PERIOD. NOTES AND REFERENCES ARE PROVIDED. (AUTHOR ABSTRACT MODIFIED)
Index Term(s): Curriculum; Elementary school education; Incentive systems; Juvenile delinquency prevention; Planning; Program evaluation; Remedial education; School delinquency programs
Note: REPORTS OF THE NATIONAL JUVENILE JUSTICE ASSESSMENT CENTERS
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=66332

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