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NCJ Number: 66472 Find in a Library
Title: CHILDREN'S HEARING SYSTEM - THE LIMITS TO SOCIAL WORK INFLUENCE - PART 2
Journal: JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WELFARE LAW  Dated:(JANUARY 1979)  Pages:86-96
Author(s): D MAY
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 11
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United Kingdom
Annotation: IN RESTRUCTURING THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM, THE 1968 SCOTTISH SOCIAL WORK ACT ALSO EXPANDED THE ROLE AND INFLUENCE OF THE SOCIAL WORKER.
Abstract: THE 1964 KILBRANDON REPORT REFLECTED A SOCIAL WORK APPROACH IN ITS LANGUAGE AND IDEOLOGY. THE GOVERNMENT THEN TURNED TO SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS FOR ADVICE WHEN DEVELOPING NEW LEGISLATION. FORMATION OF CHILDREN'S PANELS OR TRIBUNALS SHOWED STRONG INPUT FROM SOCIAL WORKERS. APPLICATION FORMS EMPHASIZED EXPERIENCE IN SOCIAL SERVICE ACTIVITIES, AND MANY LOCAL COMMITTEES WERE ADVISED BY SOCIAL WORKERS. THE SOCIAL WORK SERVICE GROUP, ORIGINALLY FORMED TO SUPERVISE THE REFORM LEGISLATION THROUGH PARLIAMENT, OVERSEES THE TRAINING PROGRAM REQUIRED FOR ALL PANEL MEMBERS. SOCIAL WORKERS CAN PLAY A CENTRAL ROLE IN THE CHILDREN'S HEARING SINCE THEY CONTROL MOST OF THE INFORMATION NECESSARY TO EVALUATE A CASE AND RECOMMEND TREATMENT. IN PRACTICE SOCIAL WORK INFLUENCE IS CONTAINED BY STRUCTURAL AND IDEOLOGICAL FEATURES WHICH ENCOURAGE AND ENABLE PANEL WORKERS TO FASHION THEIR ROLE SOMEWHAT INDEPENDENTLY OF THE SOCIAL WORKER. MEMBERS MAY HAVE GREATER KNOWLEDGE OF INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS, PARTICULARLY IN RURAL AREAS, AND OFTEN VIEW THE SOCIAL WORKER'S DETACHED PROFESSIONALISM WITH SUSPICION. THE CHILDREN'S HEARING SYSTEM CAN PROMOTE CONFLICT BETWEEN PROFESSIONALS AND LAY SUPERVISORS WHO FEEL THEY ARE EQUALLY COMPETENT. IN THE FINAL ANALYSIS TREATMENT HAS NOT PROVED WORKABLE IN JUVENILE JUSTICE, AND THE SYSTEM IS LIKELY TO REVERT TO THE COURT MODEL. MANY SOCIAL WORKERS WOULD NOT OPPOSE THIS TREND SINCE UNDER THE COURTS THEIR ROLES WERE WELL DEFINED AND THEIR CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS PROTECTED. IN AN ALTERNATIVE SOLUTION, SOCIAL WORKERS WOULD HAVE TO ACCOUNT FOR THEIR DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT TO A PANEL. THE PRESENT HEARING SYSTEM HAS MADE SOCIAL WORKERS MORE ACCOUNTABLE FOR THEIR ACTIONS, BUT ALSO PROVIDES OPPORTUNITIES FOR INCREASED INFLUENCE. FOOTNOTES ARE INCLUDED. FOR RELATED DOCUMENT, SEE NCJ 66471. (MJM)
Index Term(s): Hearings; Juvenile court diversion; Juvenile justice system; Lay representation; Scotland; Social service agencies; Social workers
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=66472

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