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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 66619 Find in a Library
Title: LABORATORY MANUAL FOR INTRODUCTORY FORENSIC SCIENCE
Author(s): G WALTON
Corporate Author: Glencoe Publishing Co, Inc
United States of America
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 160
Sponsoring Agency: Glencoe Publishing Co, Inc
Encino, CA 91316
Sale Source: Glencoe Publishing Co, Inc
17337 Ventura Boulevard
Encino, CA 91316
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THIS MANUAL IS DESIGNED FOR THE TRAINING OF LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS AS CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATORS. EVIDENCE COLLECTION TECHNIQUES AND LABORATORY METHODS FOR EVIDENCE EVALUATION ARE PRESENTED.
Abstract: THE SUCCESSFUL PROSECUTION OF CRIMINAL CASES IS BEGINNING TO REST MORE AND MORE ON THE USE OF PHYSICAL EVIDENCE, FOR WHICH THE CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATOR AND THE CRIMINALIST ARE PRIMARILY RESPONSIBLE. IF PHYSICAL EVIDENCE IS TO HAVE SCIENTIFIC AND LEGAL VALIDITY, IT MUST BE PROPERLY PROTECTED. EVIDENCE MUST BE DOCUMENTED, HANDLED AND WITNESSED IN A LEGALLY PRESCRIBED MANNER AND TO ENSURE SCIENTIFIC VALIDITY, THERE SHOULD BE NO CONTAMINATION OR CHANGING OF THE EVIDENCE. THE TRAINING FOR OFFICERS DEALING WITH PHYSICAL EVIDENCE IS DIVIDED INTO 30 LABORATORY UNITS, BEGINNING WITH THE SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND ON MEASUREMENT, THE SEPARATION OF MIXTURES, DENSITY, BRIGHT-LINE SPECTRA, THE REFRACTOMETER, AND THE INSTRUMENT DEMONSTRATION LAB. TECHNIQUES FOR OBTAINING AND PRESERVING SPECIFIC TYPES OF EVIDENCE ARE TAUGHT FOR SHOEPRINT AND TIREPRINT CASTING AND INTERPRETATION, AND FOR RESTORING BROKEN GLASS. TAKING FINGERPRINTS WITH A VARIETY OF METHODS IS TAUGHT; AS IS FINGERPRINT READING AND CLASSIFICATION. MICROSCOPIC EVIDENCE, CLOTH, BLOOD AND OTHER PHYSIOLOGICAL FLUIDS, DANGEROUS DRUGS, AND DOCUMENTS AS EVIDENCE ARE DISCUSSED. ARSON AND BOMB INVESTIGATIONS AND TRACING TECHNIQUES AND MATERIALS ARE ADDITIONAL TOPICS COVERED. THE CONCLUDING CHAPTER IS DEVOTED TO CRIME SCENE RECONSTRUCTION AND EVIDENCE COLLECTION. MOST UNITS IN THE MANUAL WILL TAKE A 2-HOUR PERIOD FOR COMPLETION, AND, AS A WHOLE, ARE SUITABLE FOR A TWO-SEMESTER COURSE WITH ONE LAB PERIOD WEEKLY. UNITS BEGIN WITH A LISTING OF REQUIRED MATERIALS. CHECKLISTS AND QUIZZES ARE PROVIDED. APPENDIXES CONTAIN A TABLE OF CONVERSION FACTORS AND A TYPICAL REPORT FORMAT. ILLUSTRATIVE MATERIAL IS PROVIDED. (MRK)
Index Term(s): Casting techniques; Crime laboratories; Crime scene; Crime Scene Investigation; Criminalistics; Document analysis; Drug analysis; Evidence collection; Evidence identification; Evidence preservation; Fingerprints; Firearms identification; Glass analysis; Hair and fiber analysis; Latent fingerprints; Paint analysis
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=66619

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