skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 66718 Find in a Library
Title: POLITICS OF THE SAFE STREETS ACT, 1965-1973 - A CASE STUDY IN EVOLVING FEDERALISM AND THE NATIONAL LEGISLATIVE PROCESS
Author(s): B MAHONEY
Date Published: 1976
Page Count: 323
Sponsoring Agency: UMI Dissertation Services
Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346
Sale Source: UMI Dissertation Services
300 North Zeeb Road
P.O. Box 1346
Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346
United States of America
Type: Thesis/Dissertation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: POLITICAL INFLUENCES ON THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS, DIFFICULTIES IN IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL GRANT PROGRAMS, AND OBSTACLES TO THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE TITLE I PROGRAM ARE DISCUSSED.
Abstract: THIS STUDY ANALYZES THE PROCESS OF POLICY FORMULATION AND PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION WHICH HAS OCCURRED WITH RESPECT TO TITLE I OF THE OMNIBUS CRIME CONTROL AND SAFE STREETS ACT OF 1968. THE ROLE OF CONGRESS IN DENYING BROAD DISCRETIONARY AUTHORITY TO FEDERAL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICIALS IS DISCUSSED, AND THE EXPERIENCE OF THE LEAA PROGRAM BETWEEN 1968 AND 1973 IS RELATED, INCLUDING SPECIFIC PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED. THEY INCLUDED DEEP-ROOTED SOCIETAL CONFLICTS OVER THE NATURE OF THE CRIME PROBLEM AND APPROPRIATE WAYS OF ADDRESSING IT, STATUTORY AMBIGUITY REGARDING PROGRAM GOALS, A MULTIPLICITY OF PARTICIPANTS INVOLVED IN THE POLICY PROCESS AT EVERY LEVEL OF GOVERNMENT, AND A SCARCITY OF RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO TITLE I IN COMPARISON TO THE EXTENT AND COMPLEXITY OF THE CRIME PROBLEM. THE STUDY WAS CONDUCTED PARTLY THROUGH INTERVIEWS WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE OFFICIALS, POLITICIANS, AND LAW SCHOLARS. THE STUDY CONCLUDED THAT CONGRESS HAD THE DOMINANT ROLE IN SHAPING THE FINAL CONTENT OF TITLE I LEGISLATION, NOT A SUBORDINATE ROLE TO THE PRESIDENCY. THE BASIC BLOCK GRANT STRUCTURE OF THE TITLE I PROGRAM WAS ALSO FOUND TO BE A FLEXIBLE ONE, ALLOWING FOR DECENTRALIZATION OF PLANNING AND DAY-TO-DAY OPERATIONAL RESPONSIBILITY. CRITICISMS OF THE LEAA PROGRAM WERE ADDRESSED BY CONGRESS IN AMENDING THE LEGISLATION. CONGRESS PLAYED AN INDEPENDENT, CONSTRUCTIVE, AND RESPONSIVE ROLE IN THIS CASE. THE AMENDED TITLE I LEGISLATION, EMBODYING A MODIFIED BLOCK GRANT CONCEPT, IS DESCRIBED AS A POSSIBLE MODEL FOR FUTURE FEDERAL GRANT PROGRAMS IN WHICH BOTH STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS HAVE IMPORTANT STAKES. FOOTNOTES ARE INCLUDED. AN APPENDIX LISTS PERSONS INTERVIEWED FOR THIS STUDY ALONG WITH THEIR OFFICIAL TITLES AND POSITIONS AT THE TIME OF THE INTERVIEWS. A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF APPROXIMATELY 110 REFERENCES IS APPENDED.
Index Term(s): Crime Control Programs; Federal government; Federal programs; Law Enforcement Assistance Administration (LEAA); Legislation; Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act; Political influences; Program financing
Note: *This document is currently unavailable from NCJRS. SPECIAL PRICES FOR ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY - DOCTORAL DISSERTATION
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=66718

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.