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NCJ Number: 66810 Find in a Library
Title: BURN-OUT SYNDROME
Author(s): H J FREUDENBERGER
Corporate Author: TFL Press - Training for Living, Inc
United States of America
Date Published: Unknown
Page Count: 10
Sponsoring Agency: TFL Press - Training for Living, Inc
Mattituck, NY 11952
Sale Source: TFL Press - Training for Living, Inc
P.O. Box 1422
Mattituck, NY 11952
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THE BURN-OUT SYNDROME IS DEFINED, WITH ATTENTION TO THE SYMPTOMS, THE VICTIMS, AND PREVENTIVE MEASURES.
Abstract: BURN-OUT REFERS TO A COMMON PHENOMENON OBSERVED IN INDIVIDUALS WORKING IN THERAPEUTIC COMMUNITIES, CRASH PADS, NEIGHBORHOOD OUTREACH PROGRAMS, AND CRISIS INTERVENTION CENTERS. APPROXIMATELY 1 YEAR AFTER A PERSON HAS BEGUN TO WORK FOR THE AGENCY, HE MAY DISPLAY ONE OR MORE OF THEE FOLLOWING SYMPTOMS: EXHAUSTION, FATIGUE, INABILITY TO SHAKE A COLD, FREQUENT HEADACHES, GASTROINTESTINAL DISTURBANCES, LOSS OF APPETITE AND SLEEP, IRRITABILITY, OUTBURST OF TEMPER, ANXIETY, DEPRESSION, PARANOIA, FREQUENT LATENESS, ABSENTEEISM, OVER-IDENTIFICATION WITH CLIENTS, LACK OF SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS, AND LACK OF PHYSICAL EXERCISE. THE TYPES OF PERSONS MOST SUSCEPTIBLE TO THE BURN-OUT SYNDROME ARE DEDICATED AND COMMITTED WORKERS AND PERSONALITIES PRONE TO GUILT FEELINGS (E.G., MEMBERS OF THE MIDDLE CLASS EXPERIENCING GUILT BECAUSE OF THEIR PRIVILEGED POSITION). BURNT-OUT STAFF MEMBERS SHOULD NOT BE RIDICULED OR HARASSED. THEY NEED ENCOURAGEMENT, MORE PHYSICAL EXERCISE, MORE FREE TIME, OBJECTIVITY, A SENSE OF DISTANCE FROM THE JOB, AND A REDUCTION OF THE EMOTIONAL OVER-INVOLVEMENT WITH CLIENTS. SUGGESTIONS FOR PREVENTING FUTURE BURN-OUTS INCLUDE MOVING STAFF MEMBERS AROUND IN THEIR TASKS, ROTATING HOURS, ASSURING THAT THE STAFF MEMBERS KEEP UP THEIR OUTSIDE ACTIVITIES AND SOCIAL CONTACTS, AVOIDING THE MONOTOMY OF IDENTICAL ROUTINE TASKS AND RECOGNIZING THAT SOCIAL WORKERS HAVE A NEED FOR RECOGNITION, STATUS, AND SELF-WORTH JUST AS DO THE CLIENTS. THE ARTICLE CONTAINS NO REFERENCES. (SAJ)
Index Term(s): Mental disorders; Mental health; Occupational safety and health; Personality; Self concept; Social workers; Treatment
Note: SPECIAL PRICES FOR TEN OR MORE COPIES. REPRINT FROM THE NEWSLETTER OF TRAINING FOR LIVING, INC
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=66810

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