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NCJ Number: 66874 Find in a Library
Title: PIMA COUNTY JUVENILE COURT CENTER, TUCSON, ARIZONA, 1977 ANNUAL REPORT (FROM JUVENILES IN JUSTICE - A BOOK OF READINGS, 1980, BY H TED RUBIN - SEE NCJ-66872)
Author(s): ANON
Corporate Author: Goodyear Publishing Co
United States of America
Date Published: 1980
Page Count: 15
Sponsoring Agency: Goodyear Publishing Co
Santa Monica, CA 90401
Type: Report (Annual/Periodic)
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THIS 1977 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PIMA COUNTY JUVENILE COURT CENTER IN TUSCON, ARIZ., EMPHASIZES EFFORTS TOWARD COMMUNITY TREATMENT OF JUVENILES AND DEINSTITUTIONALIZATION OF STATUS OFFENDERS.
Abstract: THE COURT SERVED AN ESTIMATED 1977 POPULATION OF 468,000, WHICH WAS 70 PERCENT ANGLO, 3 PERCENT BLACK, 3 PERCENT INDIAN, AND 24 PERCENT MEXICAN-AMERICAN. THE JUVENILE COURT CENTER IS A FULL-FLEDGED DIVISION OF THE PIMA COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT. IT HAS EXCLUSIVE ORIGINAL JURISDICTION OVER CHILDREN 18 YEARS OLD ALLEGED TO BE DELINQUENT, DEPENDENT, OR INCORRIGIBLE. ITS BASIC PHILOSOPHY IS THAT THE FAMILY INSTITUTION OF CHOICE FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIALIZATION OF CHILDREN. IN 1977, 13,701 JUVENILES WERE REFERRED TO COURT; A TOTAL OF 17,489 OFFENSES WERE INVOLVED, INCLUDING TRAFFIC OFFENSES. THE INTAKE RECEIVING OFFICERS DETAINED 1,461 JUVENILES. COURT DISPOSITIONS WERE BASED ON THE PHILOSOPHY THAT FORMAL COURT PROCESSING MAY NOT HAVE CURATIVE POWERS IN AND OF ITSELF. THUS, THE SYSTEM TRIED TO KEEP JUVENILES FROM UNNECESSARILY BECOMING ENMESHED IN COURT PROCESSES. THE NUMBER OF CHILDREN COMMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS DROPPED FROM 218 IN 1970 TO 37 IN 1977, WHILE THE NUMBER PLACED IN NONCORRECTIONAL SETTINGS ROSE FROM 129 TO 254 IN THE SAME PERIOD. PROBATION IN PIMA COUMTY IS CONSIDERED TO BE THE ACTIVE INTERVENTION OF A PROBATION OFFICER AS A BROKER OF SERVICES TO MATCH THE FAMILY WITH THE RELEVANT COMMUNITY SERVICES. THE COUNTY'S MAIN METHOD FOR HANDLING STATUS OFFENDERS IS MOBILE DIVERSION, A UNIT PROVIDING CRISIS INTERVENTION SERVICES AND REFERRALS IN A CHILD'S HOME. STATUS OFFENDER REFERRALS DECLINED FROM 3,758 IN 1974 TO 1,901 IN 1975; THOSE DETAINED DECLINED FROM 979 TO 16; THOSE ADJUDICATED DECLINED FROM 200 TO 12. PROGRAMS TO PROVIDE A VARIETY OF SERVICES TO THE COURT INCLUDED INTENSIVE IN-HOME SOCIAL SERVICES, VOLUNTEER SERVICES, AND FAMILY COUNSELING. THE COURT ALSO HANDLED TRAFFIC, DEPENDENCY, AND ADOPTION CASES. UNDER AN LEAA GRANT FOR DEINSTITUTIONALIZATION OF STATUS OFFENDERS, THE COUNTY PROVIDED SHELTER CARE, SPECIALIZED ADVOCACY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL APPROACHES, OUTREACH SERVICES, AND JOB PROGRAMS. NOTES WHICH INCLUDE REFERENCES, FIGURES, AND TABLES ARE INCLUDED. (CFW)
Index Term(s): Arizona; Community-based corrections (juvenile); Deinstitutionalization; Juvenile courts
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=66874

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