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NCJ Number: 66885 Find in a Library
Title: ETHICAL PROBLEMS IN PRISON PSYCHOLOGY
Journal: CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND BEHAVIOR  Volume:7  Issue:1  Dated:(MARCH 1980)  Pages:3-10
Author(s): F W KASLOW
Corporate Author: Sage Publications, Inc
United States of America
Date Published: 1980
Page Count: 7
Sponsoring Agency: Sage Publications, Inc
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: ETHICAL ISSUES CONFRONTED BY A PRISON PSYCHOLOGIST ARE IDENTIFIED AND DISCUSSED.
Abstract: THE PRISON PSYCHOLOGIST EXPERIENCES UNIQUE ETHICAL CHALLENGES THAT MUST BE SATISFACTORILY RESOLVED IF JOB FULFILLMENT IS TO OCCUR. SOME OF THE ETHICAL ISSUES ARE BOUND UP WITH THE PSYCHOLOGIST'S BEING PAID BY A CORRECTIONAL ADMINISTRATION WITH AN AGENDA OF BEHAVIORAL CONTROLS FOR THE INMATE CLIENTS SERVED BY THE PSYCHOLOGIST. OBLIGATIONS TO EMPLOYER AND CLIENT FREQUENTLY CONFLICT. THIS IS NOTABLY SO IN THE REALM OF PROFESSIONAL CONFIDENTIALITY REGARDING CLIENT COMMUNICATIONS. CORRECTIONAL ADMINISTRATIONS COMMONLY REQUIRE THAT ALL STAFF MEMBERS REPORT ALL KNOWLEDGE OF RULE INFRINGEMENTS TO APPROPRIATE PRISON STAFF. WHILE THE ISSUE MAY BE RESOLVED BY INFORMING ALL CLIENTS OF THIS RULE PRIOR TO BEGINNING THERAPY, THE LIMITATION ON CONFIDENTIALITY MAY MAKE INMATE SHARING MORE GUARDED. A SECOND IMPORTANT ETHICAL ISSUE RELATES TO THE CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH THE PRISON PSYCHOLOGIST PROVIDES THERAPY. CLIENTS ARE UNDER REAL OR IMAGINED PRESSURE TO SEE THE PSYCHOLOGIST, THUS PRODUCING A SCENARIO LIKELY TO UNDERMINE PROGRESS IN THERAPY. ALSO, THE PSYCHOLOGIST IS GREATLY RESTRICTED IN THERAPEUTICALLY GUIDING INMATE CLIENTS TOWARD HEALTHY BEHAVIOR APPROPRIATE TO COMMUNITY LIFE, WHEN THE IMMEDIATE PRISON ENVIRONMENT DISCOURAGES OR PROHIBITS SUCH BEHAVIOR. STILL, INMATES CANNOT BE ABANDONED BY THOSE PROVIDING PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES. PROFESSIONAL ETHICS REQUIRE THAT SUCH SERVICES BE EXTENDED. THE ETHICAL ISSUES ARE COMPLEX, AND PRISON PSYCHOLOGISTS MUST DEVELOP SATISFACTORY WAYS OF HANDLING THEM IF THE JOB PERFORMED IS TO HAVE MEANING FOR THEM AND THE INMATES SERVED. REFERENCES AND ILLUSTRATIONS ARE PROVIDED. (RCB)
Index Term(s): Inmate Programs; Professional conduct and ethics; Psychiatric services; Psychologists
Note: PRESENTED AT THE AMERICAN PSYCHIATRIC ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE, MAY 15, 1979, CHIGAGO ILLINOIS
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=66885

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