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NCJ Number: 67062 Find in a Library
Title: INFLUENCE OF PERCEPTIONS OF PERSONAL CONTROL ON REACTIONS TO STRESSFUL EVENTS
Journal: JOURNAL OF COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY  Volume:26  Issue:6  Dated:(1979)  Pages:473-480
Author(s): L A GILBERT; D MANGELSDORFF
Corporate Author: American Psychological Assoc
United States of America
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 8
Sponsoring Agency: American Psychological Assoc
Washington, DC 20002-4242
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THIS STUDY TESTS THE ASSUMPTION THAT BELIEFS OF HIGH PERSONAL CONTROL PREDISPOSE INDIVIDUALS TO GREATER STRESS IN THE FACE OF DIFFICULT LIFE EVENTS.
Abstract: A SAMPLE OF 46 CLIENTS AT A UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER AND TWO SAMPLES OF 67 AND 145 NONCLIENT STUDENTS COMPLETED SURVEYS RELATED TO THE OCCURRENCE OF STRESSFUL EVENTS. SUBJECTS' PERCEPTIONS OF PERSONAL CONTROL WERE MEASURED BY LEVENSON'S INTERNALITY SCALE. THEY WERE CATEGORIZED AS EXHIBITING HIGH, MEDIUM, OR LOW PERCEPTIONS OF PERSONAL CONTROL (CHARACTERISTIC INTERNALITY). STRESS AT THE TIME OF PSYCHOLOGICAL HELP-SEEKING WAS ASSESSED BY COMPARING CLIENTS AND NONCLIENTS ON SELF-ESTEEM AND PERCEPTIONS OF CONTROL OVER RECENT LIFE EVENTS. SUBJECTS ALSO INDICATED THE DEGREE OF STRESS THEY ASSOCIATED WITH EXPERIENCES OF SOCIAL ISOLATION AND POWERLESSNESS. AS PREDICTED, HIGH INTERNALS GENERALLY REPORTED HIGHER STRESS THAN MODERATE OR LOW INTERNALS; AND HIGH INTERNAL CLIENTS, IN COMPARISON WITH NONCLIENT CONTROLS, REPORTED LOWER SELF-ESTEEM, HIGHER STRESS, AND LESS CONTROL OVER RECENT EVENTS. LOW INTERNAL CLIENTS GENERALLY DID NOT BEHAVE AS PREDICTED. THESE RESULTS SUGGEST THAT CLIENTS' PERCEPTIONS OF PERSONAL CONTROL ORIENTATION OF COUNSELORS MAY ALSO INFLUENCE TREATMENT, AND THAT FURTHER COMPARISONS OF INTERNALS, MODERATES, AND EXTERNALS ALSO ARE NEEDED. THE RESEARCH IS LIMITED BY SAMPLE SIZE, THE NATURE OF THE SAMPLE, LACK OF DIRECT CLIENT COMPARISON OF STRESSFUL LIFE EXPERIENCE, AND THE USE OF SELF-REPORT AS OPPOSED TO BEHAVIORAL DATA. FOOTNOTES AND REFERENCES ARE PROVIDED. (AUTHOR ABSTRACT MODIFIED--AOP)
Index Term(s): Behavior patterns; Behavior under stress; Behavioral science research; Personnel; Psychological theories
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=67062

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