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NCJ Number: 67120 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SUPERIOR COURT - A DESCRIPTIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE PROCESSING OF JUVENILE CASES
Author(s): M R BURT
Corporate Author: Burt Associates, Inc
United States of America
Date Published: Unknown
Page Count: 69
Sponsoring Agency: Burt Associates, Inc
Bethesda, MD 20014
District of Columbia Bar Court Study Cmtte
Washington, DC 20006
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
Redskin Foundation
Bethesda, MD 20015
US Dept of Justice
Washington, DC 20531
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Type: Statistics
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THE FUNCTIONING OF THE FAMILY DIVISION OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SUPERIOR COURT IS EXAMINED, USING DATA FROM RANDOM SAMPLES OF ALLEGED DELINQUENT YOUTH FROM THE 1977 COURT FILES.
Abstract: AREAS EXAMINED INCLUDED PRETRIAL DETENTION, ELAPSED TIME TO TRIAL, JUDICIAL CONTINUITY, REVIEW HEARINGS, AND SOCIAL FACTORS. RESULTS SHOWED THAT ALMOST HALF OF THE YOUTHS ARRESTED AND OVER HALF OF THOSE PETITIONED WERE DETAINED PRIOR TO TRIAL FOR AN AVERAGE OF 63 DAYS. FEW WERE DETAINED AS A RESULT OF DISPOSITION HEARINGS AND JUVENILES WERE MUCH MORE LIKELY TO BE DETAINED THAN WERE ADULTS CHARGED WITH SIMILAR OFFENSES. THE MEDIAN ELAPSED TIME BETWEEN PETITION AND TRIAL WAS 61 TO 90 DAYS; THE AVERAGE WAS 111 DAYS. THERE WAS LITTLE CONTINUITY WITH RESPECT TO JUDGES HEARING PARTICULAR CASES, PROBABLY BECAUSE OF THE ROTATION OF JUDGES IN AND OUT OF THE FAMILY DIVISION. REVIEW HEARINGS WERE HELD IN ONLY TWO-THIRDS OF THE CASES REACHING FINAL DISPOSITION. THREE-QUARTERS OF THOSE CONVICTED WERE FROM FAMILIES IN WHICH PARENTS WERE NOT MARRIED; ALMOST HALF WERE FROM FAMILIES RECEIVING PUBLIC ASSISTANCE. IN ADDITION, MANY OR MOST WERE VICTIMS OF ABUSE OR NEGLECT, WERE BELOW NORMAL IN MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, AND HAD POOR SCHOOL CONDUCT, ATTENDANCE, AND ACHIEVEMENT RECORDS. IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT BOTH THE NUMBER OF JUVENILES DETAINED AND THE LENGTH OF DETENTION PRIOR TO TRIAL BE REDUCED. ALSO, THE LENGTH OF TIME REQUIRED TO BRING A CASE TO TRIAL SHOULD BE REDUCED THROUGH DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIFIC RULES AND CRITERIA ON CONTINUANCES. JUDGES SHOULD SPECIALIZE AND ROTATION OF JUDGES IN AND OUT OF THE FAMILY DIVISION SHOULD END. FINALLY, REVIEW HEARINGS SHOULD BE MORE COMMON AND THE USE OF DELINQUENCY PREVENTION PROGRAMS BE STUDIED. TABLES, FIGURES, FOOTNOTES, AND AN APPENDIX DISCUSSING SAMPLING TOLERANCES ARE INCLUDED. (CFW)
Index Term(s): Court delays; District of Columbia; Evaluation; Family courts; Juvenile court statistics; Juvenile detention; Juvenile educational background
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=67120

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