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NCJ Number: 67348 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: DISRUPTION IN SIX HUNDRED SCHOOLS - THE SOCIAL ECOLOGY OF PERSONAL VICTIMIZATION IN THE NATION'S PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Author(s): G D GOTTFREDSON; D C DAIGER
Corporate Author: Johns Hopkins University
Ctr for Social Organization of Schools
United States of America
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 235
Sponsoring Agency: Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, MD 21218
US Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare
Washington, DC 20203
Grant Number: NIE-G-78-0210
Publication Number: 289
Type: Survey
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THE RELATIONSHIP OF A VARIETY OF SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY CHARACTERISTICS TO TEACHER AND STUDENT VICTIMIZATION RATES IN SCHOOLS IS DESCRIBED, AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR REDUCING THE RATES ARE MADE.
Abstract: QUESTIONNAIRE DATA WERE GATHERED FOR GRADES 7 THROUGH 12 FROM 642 SCHOOLS (WITH A 76 PERCENT RESPONSE): 623 PRINCIPALS RESPONDED ON 261 ITEMS; 23,895 TEACHERS ANSWERED 187 ITEMS; AND 31,373 STUDENTS (81 PERCENT), RESPONDED ON 167 ITEMS. CENSUS COUNTS PROVIDED INFORMATION ABOUT THE COMMUNITIES IN WHICH THE SCHOOLS WERE LOCATED. A FACTOR ANALYSIS GUIDED THE DEVELOPMENT OF SCALES MEASURING COMMUNITY AND SCHOOL CHARACTERISTICS, AND A PATH MODEL WAS USED TO ASSESS THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF SCHOOL CHARACTERISTICS TO THE EXPLANATION OF VICTIMIZATION RATES. THE RESULTS SHOWED THAT LARGE SCHOOLS WITH LIMITED RESOURCES, WITH POOR COOPERATION BETWEEN TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATION, AND WITH POOR RULE ENFORCEMENT EXPERIENCE HIGH VICTIMIZATION RATES. THEREFORE, RATES MAY BE LOWERED (1) BY REDUCING THE SIZES OF SCHOOLS SO THAT TEACHERS HAVE EXTENSIVE RESPONSIBILITY FOR AND CONTACT WITH A LIMITED NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN SEVERAL ASPECTS OF THEIR EDUCATION, (2) BY IMPROVING THE COOPERATION BETWEEN TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATION, AND (3) BY PROVIDING CLEAR RULES WHICH ARE FIRMLY ENFORCED AND EQUITABLY ADMINISTERED. SINCE TEACHER VICTIMIZATION RATES ARE HIGH IN SCHOOLS LOCATED IN AREAS CHARACTERIZED BY MUCH POVERTY, UNEMPLOYMENT, AND A HIGH PROPORTION OF FEMALE-HEADED FAMILIES, COMMUNITY AND GOVERNMENT ACTION WHICH ALTER THESE CONDITIONS MAY INFLUENCE THE LEVELS OF SCHOOL DISRUPTION. FOOTNOTES, CHARTS, TABLES, AND A REFERENCE LIST ARE PROVIDED, AND APPENDIXES CONTAINING THE QUESTIONNAIRES AND THE ITEM CONTENT OF THE SCALES ARE INCLUDED.
Index Term(s): Crime in schools; Demography; Schools; Socioculture; Students; Victimization; Victimization surveys
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=67348

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