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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 67535 Find in a Library
Title: NEW YORK - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SERVICE - '911' - A STAFF REGULATORY VIEWPOINT OF THE UNIVERSAL EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBER
Author(s): L A CEDDIA
Corporate Author: New York State
Dept of Public Service
Public Service Cmssn
United States of America
Editor(s): A E RODGER
Date Published: 1973
Page Count: 66
Sponsoring Agency: New York State
Albany, NY 12223
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THE ORIGINS AND DEVELOPMENT, ADVANTAGES, CURRENT STATUS, AND IMPLEMENTATION OBSTACLES OF THE '911' EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBER ARE EXAMINED; THE SYSTEM IS RECOMMENDED FOR NEW YORK STATE.
Abstract: THE REPORT WAS PREPARED FOR THE NEW YORK STATE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION, AND IT BEGINS WITH A REVIEW OF THE HISTORY OF THE '911' EMERGENCY NUMBER FROM THE INTRODUCTION OF A '999' NUMBER IN GREAT BRITAIN OVER 30 YEARS AGO TO THE FIRST U.S. '911' SYSTEM IN ALABAMA IN 1968. THE '911' NUMBER PROVIDES AN EASILY REMEMBERED NUMBER WHICH MAKES DIALING FASTER, REDUCES THE OVERALL RESPONSE TIME, BENEFITS TRAVELERS AND NEW RESIDENTS, AND ENCOURAGES CITIZEN INVOLVEMENT IN EMERGENCIES. ABOUT 240 '911' SYSTEMS PROVIDE SERVICE TO 18,5000,000 PERSONS IN THE UNITED STATES, AND 61 NEW SYSTEMS ARE PLANNED FOR USE BY THE END OF 1974. FEDERAL LEGISLATION ENCOURAGES SUCH SYSTEMS BY PROVIDING FUNDS TO ASSIST IN THEIR IMPLEMENTATION THROUGH AMENDMENTS OF THE OMNIBUS CRIME CONTROL AND SAFE STREETS ACT AND THE COMMUNICATIONS ACT OF 1934. FURTHERMORE, THE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION PROVIDES ADVICE TO INTERESTED LOCAL AND STATE GOVERNMENTS. NEW YORK STATE BECAME ACTIVELY INVOLVED IN 1968 AND NOW HAS 11 SYSTEMS AND PLANS FOR 2 MORE FOR 1973. THE MAJOR OBSTACLE TO '911' IMPLEMENTATION IS THE NON-COINCIDENCE OF JURISDICTIONAL AND TELEPHONE CENTRAL OFFICE BOUNDARIES. SOLUTIONS TO THIS PROBLEM ARE OFFERED. THE '911' NUMBER IS RECOMMENDED FOR NEW YORK STATE, AND THE ROUTING OF EVERY '911' CALL TO AN EMERGENCY REPORT CENTER OR, IF ONE IS LACKING, TO A TELEPHONE COMPANY OPERATOR IS SUGGESTED. TABLES WITH INFORMATION ON PRESENT U.S. SYSTEMS, FOOTNOTES, AND 14 REFERENCES ARE PROVIDED. APPENDIXES CONTAIN FEDERAL LEGISLATION, A CALIFORNIA LAW, GENERAL TELEPHONE AND ELECTRONICS' '911' GUIDELINES, A CRIME INDEX OF MAJOR CITIES, AND A TELEPHONE EXCISE TAX FUNDING PROPOSAL ARE INCLUDED.
Index Term(s): New York; Nine-one-one (911) emergency telephone number; Telephone communications
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=67535

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