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NCJ Number: 67800 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: STRESS AND CRIME - COLLOQUIUM, ARLINGTON (VA), DECEMBER 4-5, 1978, V 2 - INVITED PAPERS
Corporate Author: Mitre Corporation
Washington Operations
United States of America
Editor(s): M J MOLOF
Date Published: 1980
Page Count: 179
Sponsoring Agency: Mitre Corporation
Mclean, VA 22101
National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 78-NI-AX-0053
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Document: PDF
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: SOLICITED PAPERS FOR A COLLOQUIUM ON STRESS AND CRIME LOOK AT PSYCHOLOGICAL, ECONOMICAL, SOCIOLOGICAL, AND RACIAL VARIABLES THAT MAY CONTRIBUTE TO STRESS AND LEAD TO CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR.
Abstract: A STUDY SETS FORTH THE ARGUMENT THAT CROWDING IS NOT GENERALLY STRESSFUL, THAT IT DOES NOT PRODUCE MENTAL DISTURBANCES, AND THAT IT IS NOT A CAUSE OF CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR. AN ANALYSIS SUGGESTS THAT THE LARGER VARIABLES OF SOCIAL CLASS PLUS CONDITIONS OF SOCIAL CHANGE SURROUNDING ETHNIC AND CULTURAL GROUPS MUST AFFECT THE INTRAPSYCHIC FUNCTIONING OF INDIVIDUALS, AND SUCH RESULTANT VARIABLES AS CRIME AND SOCIOPATHY. A DISCUSSION SHOWS THAT BLACK FAMILY VIOLENCE IS INEXTRICABLY LINKED TO ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS FACTORS. AN EXAMINATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BRAIN DYSFUNCTION AND CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR PROFFERS BRAIN DYSFUNCTION AS AN ORGANIC DETERMINANT OF STRESS. STRATEGIES ARE PRESENTED FOR A TRANSACTIONAL VIEW OF PRISON STRESS THAT HIGHLIGHTS DIFFERENTIAL INMATE VULNERABILITY TO STRESS AND ASSUMES DIFFERENTIAL STRESSOR PROPERTIES (OR AMELIORATIVE CAPACITIES) OF PRISON SETTINGS. A SERIES OF THEORETICAL APPROACHES, RESEARCH MODELS AND ISSUES, AND FINDINGS ARE DISCUSSED THAT DEAL WITH CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR AS RELATED TO ECONOMIC CHANGE AND STRESS. A QUANTITATIVE METHOD IS USED TO ASSESS THE LIFE SITUATION SURROUNDING CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR AND SUBSEQUENT ARREST. IN ADDITION, ATTENTION IS GIVEN TO THE BIOCHEMISTRY OF STRESS REACTION AND CRIME AND TO STRESS AND ASSAULT IN A NATIONAL SAMPLE OF AMERICAN FAMILIES. REFERENCES, TABLES, AND GRAPHS PROVIDE SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION FOR THE PAPERS. FOR SPECIFIC PAPERS, SEE NCJ # 67801-07. (MHP)
Index Term(s): Behavior under stress; Biological influences; Crime Causes; Economic influences; Neurological disorders; Nonbehavioral correlates of crime; Overcrowding; Social conditions
Note: NCJ-67800 ALSO CONTAINS NCJ-67801 THROUGH 67807.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=67800

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