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NCJ Number: 67812 Find in a Library
Title: JAIL AND PRISON GANGS (FROM INTERAGENCY WORKSHOP - ANNUAL, 14TH, P 31-36, 1979 - SEE NCJ-67808)
Author(s): T F LONERGAN
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 6
Document: PDF
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THIS ESSAY DISCUSSES THE PROBLEM OF ORGANIZED PRISON GANGS WHOSE ACTIVITIES INCLUDE TRAFFICKING IN NARCOTICS AND FIREARMS.
Abstract: THESE SOPHISTICATED ORGANIZATIONS EVOLVE IN PRISONS AND TRANSFER THEIR POWER TO THE STREET. BEGINNING IN 1975, PRISON GANGS INFILTRATED STATE AND FEDERAL DRUG ABUSE AND REHABILITATION PROGRAMS AND SUCCESSFULLY TOOK OVER SEVERAL PROGRAMS SUCH AS THE GET GOING PROJECT IN LOS ANGELES. FROM 1975 TO 1978, 150 MURDERS WERE COMMITTED ON THE STREETS AND IN THE PRISON SYSTEM OF CALIFORNIA, WHICH ARE DIRECTLY ATTRIBUTABLE TO THE PRISON GANG MOVEMENT. THESE GROUPS HAVE MOVED OUT OF CALIFORNIA, AND DATA DOCUMENT THEIR EXISTENCE IN ARIZONA, NEW MEXICO, TEXAS, OREGON, WASHINGTON AND THE U.S. BUREAU OF PRISONS SYSTEM. THE MEXICAN MAFIA OPERATES A VAST NARCOTIC TRAFFICKING BUSINESS FROM MEXICO AND PERU, AND TRANSFERS FIREARMS FROM THE U.S. INTO MEXICO. OTHER MAJOR PRISON GANGS ARE THE SYMBIONESE LIBERATION ARMY, THE BLACK GUERILLA FAMILY, AND LA NUESTRA FAMILIA. THESE GROUPS DEVELOPED IN THREE PHASES BEGINNING IN THE EARLY 1960'S, AS THEY FORMED TO PROTECT THEMSELVES AGAINST RIVAL GANGS AND OTHER PRISONERS. IN THE LATE 1960'S, THEY BEGAN TO ORGANIZE ALONG ETHNIC AND RACIAL LINES, ADOPTING RADICAL AND POLITICAL RHETORIC IN THE EARLY 1970'S. THE POLITICAL PRISONER SEE HIMSELF AS THE VICTIM OF AN OPPRESSIVE SOCIETY AND REACTS SOLELY TO THAT SOCIETY. A SECOND TYPE OF GROUP SEEKS PRISON REFORM BY OPENING ACCESS TO THE PRISONS AND INTRODUCING INFLAMMATORY REVOLUTIONARY LITERATURE INTO THE PRISON SYSTEM. MEMBERS ARE RECRUITED AS POLITICAL PRISONERS AND ARE PROMISED PUBLICITY AND FREE LEGAL DEFENSE. THESE GROUPS CAN BE CONTROLLED BY DIFFERENTIATING BETWEEN TRUE REFORM GROUPS AND THOSE THAT ARE THERE FOR OTHER PURPOSES; BY WORKING ON COOPERATIVE EFFORTS BETWEEN LOCAL, STATE, AND FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT, CORRECTIONS, AND PROBATION AUTHORITIES; BY DEVELOPING RECIPROCAL AGREEMENTS BETWEEN STATES ON THE RELOCATION OF PRISONERS AND WITNESSES; BY ENGAGING IN STAFF TRAINING ACTIVITY, AND BY EDUCATING THE PUBLIC. NO REFERENCES ARE INCLUDED.
Index Term(s): California; Correctional reform; Drug sources; Gangs; Illicit firearms; Inmate organizations; Inmate political affiliation; Organized crime
Note: NCJ 67812 AVAILABLE ON MICROFICHE FROM NCJRS UNDER NCJ 67808.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=67812

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