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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 68138 Find in a Library
Title: PREJUDICE - PERCEIVING AND BELIEVING
Author(s): M MILLER
Corporate Author: Motivational Media
United States of America

Avanti Films
United States of America
Project Director: J MILLER
Date Published: 1976
Sponsoring Agency: Avanti Films
Los Angeles, CA 90046
Harper and Row Media
Hagerstown, MD 21740
Motivational Media
Los Angeles, CA 90046
Not Available Through National Institute of Justice/NCJRS Document Loan Program
Rockville, MD 20849
Sale Source: Harper and Row Media
Order Fulfillment/Customer
2350 Virginia Avenue
Hagerstown, MD 21740
United States of America

Not Available Through National Institute of Justice/NCJRS Document Loan Program
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: THIS FILM, NARRATED BY ED ASNER, DEMONSTRATES THE NATURE OF PREJUDICE BY DISPLAYING SYMBOLS AND EVENTS AIMED AT REVEALING VIEWER RESPONSES THAT ARE COLORED BY PRECONCEIVED NOTIONS.
Abstract: DESIGNED FOR GENERAL AUDIENCES OR SPECIFIC PROFESSIONS SUCH AS LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS, THE FILM AIDS ANYONE WHOSE BEHAVIOR AND ATTITUDES MUST MEET WITH EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAM GOALS AND STANDARDS FOR A DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY. IT POINTS OUT THE PITFALLS OF PREJUDGMENT, FREQUENTLY SO INGRAINED IN THE PROCESS OF PERCEIVING, THAT IT IS NOT RECOGNIZED AS THE NEGATIVE ACT OF PREJUDICE. WHILE THE NARRATIVE COMMENTARY URGES REFLECTION AND AN OBJECTIVE PERSPECTIVE ON WHAT IS SEEN, THE FILM SHOWS A BROAD SOCIOECONOMIC CROSS-SECTION OF PEOPLE DECLARING THEIR FEELINGS ABOUT OTHERS IN TERMS OF THEIR PERCEPTIONS OF A PERSON'S RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, ETHNIC ORIGIN, SEX AND OCCUPATION. NOT ONLY PEOPLE, BUT WORDS, ISOLATED OBJECTS, PLACES, AND SYMBOLS ELICIT DIFFERENT REACTIONS FROM DIFFERENT PERCEIVERS, DEPENDING UPON THEIR BUILTIN PRECONCEPTIONS. THIS IS ILLUSTRATED BY A BARRAGE OF IMAGES ON THE SCREEN: FROM BABIES TO POLICE OFFICERS; FROM THE TAJ MAHAL TO THE U.S. CAPITOL; FROM THE STAR OF DAVID AND THE AMERICAN FLAG TO THE SWASTIKA AND THE HAMMER AND SICKLE. THE SOUND TRACK PROVIDES AN ACCOMPANYING LITANY OF FOLK-BELIEFS ABOUT OTHER'S RELIGIONS, LIFE-STYLES, AND MOTIVATIONS. THIS APPROACH INCLUDES ANGLO-SAXON IMAGES AS OBJECTS OF MINORITY PREJUDICE. POLICE RELATIONSHIPS TO PREJUDICE ARE DISPLAYED FROM TWO PERSPECTIVES. SEVERAL CITIZENS OBSERVING POLICE OFFICERS AT WORK, MAKING ARRESTS, PATROLLING A NEIGHBORHOOD, OR MERELY DISPLAYING THEIR INSIGNIA, UNIFORMS, AND WEAPONS. ON THE OTHER HAND, OFFICERS' OWN PERCEPTIONS INFLUENCING THEIR PERFORMANCE OF DUTY ARE ALSO REVEALED. A CENTRAL, PIVOTAL SCENE IN THE FILM SHOWS A BLACK YOUTH RUNNING DOWN THE STREET AND PRESENTS INTERPRETIVE COMMENTS ON THIS ACTION FROM HIS MOTHER AND GIRLFRIEND, SHOPKEEPERS AND PASSERS-BY OF OTHER RACES AND AGES, AND FINALLY FROM TWO OFFICERS, WHOSE COMMENTS BETRAY SUSPICION OF THE YOUTH. THE SAME SCENE WITH A WHITE BOY ELICITS BENEVOLENT LAXITY IN THE OFFICER'S ATTITUDES. (MRK)
Index Term(s): Affirmative action programs; Attitudes toward authority; Audiovisual aids; Equal opportunity education; Ethnic groups; Family offenses; Films; Minorities; Police attitudes; Police training; Public Attitudes/Opinion; Racial discrimination; Reverse discrimination
Note: *This document is currently unavailable from NCJRS. 28 MINUTES, 16 MM COLOR, 1976.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=68138

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