skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 68359 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: COMMUNITY SERVICE ORDER PROGRAMME IN ONTARIO (CANADA), PART 1 - A DESCRIPTION OF THE INITIAL CASES
Author(s): M POLONOSKI
Corporate Author: Ontario Ministry of Correctional Services
Planning and Research Branch
Canada
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 65
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
Ontario Ministry of Correctional Services
Scarborough, Ontario M1L 4P1, Canada
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Document: PDF
Language: English
Country: Canada
Annotation: PRELIMINARY FINDINGS FROM A 2-YEAR INVESTIGATION OF ONTARIO'S COMMUNITY SERVICE ORDERS (CSO'S) PROGRAM ARE PRESENTED. COVERING THE PROGRAM'S FIRST YEAR, 1978, THE FINDINGS CONCERN 12 PILOT PROJECTS SERVING 689 CLIENTS.
Abstract: THE CSO'S WERE INTRODUCED TO PROVIDE AN ALTERNATIVE TO INCARCERATION OF OFFENDERS WHERE THE USUAL TERMS OF PROBATION WERE AN INSUFFICIENT DISPOSITION. DURING THE FIRST YEAR, 264 PROBATIONERS COMPLETED THEIR ORDERS. THE MAJORITY OF THE CSO PROBATIONERS COMPLETED THEIR ORDERS. THE MAJORITY OF THE CSO PROBATIONERS IN THE PILOT PROJECTS WERE MALE, UNDER 20-YEARS OLD, SINGLE, AND HAD ACQUIRED AT LEAST SOME HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION. THEY HAD MOSTLY BEEN SENTENCED TO ONE OFFENSE ONLY, OFTEN A PROPERTY-RELATED OFFENSE. THE MOST COMMON CRIME OF WHICHCSO PROBATIONERS HAD BEEN CONVICTED WAS THEFT OF UNDER $200. THE PROBATION TERMS ISSUED BY THE JUDICIARY WERE USUALLY JUST OVER A YEAR IN DURATION. THE CSO PROBATIONERS WHO HAD COMPLETED THEIR ORDERS WERE ASSIGNED AN AVERAGE OF 52.7 HOURS OF COMMUNITY SERVICE WORK. THE ORDERS RANGED FROM 8 TO 348 HOURS, AND ALMOST HALF THE PROBATIONERS HAD BEEN ASSIGNED 30 HOURS OR LESS. DURING THE 12-MONTH PERIOD, PROBATIONERS WORKED A TOTAL OF 12,798 HOURS OF UNPAID COMMUNITY SERVICE. THE OVERALL SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION RATE OF THE CSO ASSIGNMENTS WAS 93 PERCENT AND OVER HALF OF THE OFFENDERS COMPLETED THEIR HOURS WITHIN 2 MONTHS OF BEGINNING THEM. COMMUNITY PLACEMENTS AND THE RESPECTIVE TASKS VARIED WITH THE RESOURCES AVAILABLE IN THE PILOT PROJECT AREAS, BUT THE MOST COMMON CHORE WAS SIMPLE MANUAL LABOR. AT LEAST 8 OUT OF EVERY 10 PROBATIONERS WERE BROUGHT INTO CONTACT WITH THE BENEFICIARIES OF THEIR EFFORTS AT SOME TIME DURING THEIR COMMUNITY SERVICE. PROBATIONERS USUALLY WORKED ALONGSIDE AND WERE SUPERVISED BY REGULAR AGENCY PAID STAFF. MOST OF THE AGENCIES REPORTED TOTAL SATISFACTION WITH THE PROBATIONERS' EFFORTS, AND ONE-FIFTH OF THE PROBATIONERS CONTINUED THEIR VOLUNTEER WORK AFTER THE COMPLETION OF THEIR ASSIGNMENTS. A FURTHER 5 PERCENT BECAME EMPLOYEES AT THEIR COMMUNITY PLACEMENTS. THUS, THE CSO PROGRAM APPEARS TO BE PROVIDING A COMMUNITY-BASED SENTENCING OPTION IN THE TREATMENT OF OFFENDERS. HOWEVER, IT IS, AS YET, DIFFICULT TO DETERMINE WHETHER THE PROGRAM IS PROVIDING AN ALTERNATIVE TO INCARCERATION OF OFFENDERS. TABLES, FIGURES, FOOTNOTES, AND REFERENCES ARE INCLUDED. A DESCRIPTION OF THE COMMUNITY PLACEMENTS AND TASKS PERFORMED IN THE 12 PILOT CSO PROJECTS AREAS IS APPENDED. FOR THE SECOND PART OF THIS REPORT, SEE NCJ 68360. (AUTHOR ABSTRACT MODIFIED)
Index Term(s): Alternatives to institutionalization; Canada; Community service order; Community-based corrections (adult); Ontario
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=68359

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.