skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 68799 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: STUDY OF THE PLACEMENT AND UTILIZATION PATTERNS AND VIEWS OF THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE GRADUATES OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
Author(s): M D MOORE
Date Published: 1972
Page Count: 161
Sponsoring Agency: Michigan Office of Criminal Justice
Lansing, MI 48909
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Thesis/Dissertation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: ANALYSIS OF 1,161 RESPONSES FROM GRADUATES OF THE SCHOOL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE BETWEEN 1938 AND 1971 SHOWS THAT MOST ARE EMPLOYED BY PUBLIC LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES; LOW PAY AND LACK OF ADVANCEMENT EXIST.
Abstract: ALTHOUGH THERE WERE 2,253 GRADUATES DURING THIS TIME PERIOD, ONLY 1,822 WERE SENT QUESTIONNAIRES. THE REST COULD NOT BE LOCATED, WERE FOREIGN STUDENTS, WERE SENT PRETEST QUESTIONNAIRES, OR WERE DECEASED. THE RESPONSE WAS 67.1 PERCENT AND MOST OF THOSE WHO RETURNED THE FORMS WERE WHITE, RECENTLY GRADUATED MALES. MOST CHOSE A PUBLIC LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY AS THEIR INITIAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (53 PERCENT), AND 45 PERCENT WERE STILL IN SUCH AN AGENCY. THOSE WHO DID NOT ENTER CRIMINAL JUSTICE REJECTED THE FIELD BECAUSE NO JOBS WERE AVAILABLE, PAY AND OPPORTUNITY FOR ADVANCEMENT, WERE LOW, OR THEY WERE PREVENTED BY A PHYSICAL RESTRICTION. FEDERAL AGENCIES SOUGHT GRADUATES MOST ACTIVELY; PRIVATE POLICE RECRUITED LEAST ACTIVELY. MOST OF THE GRADUATES FELT THAT HIRING CONSIDERATIONS SHOULD GIVE MORE WEIGHT TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE TRAINING. ALTHOUGH THERE WAS CONSIDERABLE JOB CHANGING, MOST RESPONDENTS WERE STILL IN THEIR INITIAL AREA OF EMPLOYMENT (74 PERCENT WHO BEGAN IN PUBLIC LAW ENFORCEMENT ARE STILL IN THE FIELD; 84 PERCENT WHO BEGAN ELSEWHERE ARE NOW IN LAW ENFORCEMENT). MOST FEEL THEIR TRAINING IS BEING UTILIZED IN THEIR PRESENT POSITIONS, BUT THEY RECOMMEND MORE MELDING OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND ADMINISTRATION COURSES. THOSE WHO WOULD HAVE CHOSEN ANOTHER MAJOR WOULD NOW PREFER LAW OR BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. TABLES GIVE STUDY STATISTICS. A BIBLIOGRAPHY AND THE SURVEY INSTRUMENT ARE APPENDED.
Index Term(s): Career development; Criminal justice education; Employment; Higher education; Occupational mobility; Pay rates; Personnel promotion; Professional recognition
Note: MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY - DOCTORAL THESIS
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=68799

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.