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NCJ Number: 68922 Find in a Library
Title: GENERAL INVESTIGATIVE AREAS - THE CRIME SCENE (FROM INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC SCIENCES, P 37-47, 1980, BY WILLIAM G ECKERT - SEE NCJ-71044)
Author(s): J MALONEY
Date Published: 1980
Page Count: 11
Sponsoring Agency: C V Mosby Co
St Louis, MO 63141
Sale Source: C V Mosby Co
11836 Westline Industrial Drive
St Louis, MO 63141
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: COLLECTION OF EVIDENCE AT THE CRIME SCENE IS DISCUSSED IN THIS CHAPTER FROM 'INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC SCIENCES'; THE COLLECTION PROCESS, RETRIEVAL PROBLEMS, MARKING, AND TRANSPORTATION OF EVIDENCE ARE HIGHLIGHTED.
Abstract: THE SUCCESS OF ANY INVESTIGATION IS PREDICATED ON THE PROPER COLLECTION OF INFORMATION AND EVIDENCE BY EXPERIENCED SCENE INVESTIGATORS WHO ARE PART OF THE CRIMINALISTICS OR MEDICOLEGAL TEAM. INVESTIGATION OF A CRIME SCENE OR A MAJOR ACCIDENT REQUIRES CONSIDERABLE EXPERTISE IN DOCUMENTATION, AND THE INVESTIGATOR MUST DEVELOP PROFICIENCY IN SEVERAL AREAS INCLUDING PHOTOGRAPHY, DRAWING, AND WRITING. THE PRIMARY OBJECTIVE OF EVIDENCE COLLECTION AT THE CRIME SCENE IS THAT AN ITEM MUST BE SECURED IN SUCH A MANNER THAT IT CAN SERVE AS ACCEPTABLE INTELLIGENCE IN A JUDICIAL OR CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. INTEGRITY OF THE RETRIEVED ITEM MUST THEREFORE BE MAINTAINED. EVIDENCE COLLECTION MUST PROCEED FROM THE GENERAL TO THE PARTICULAR. A 'WALK THROUGH' THE SCENE INITIATES THIS PROCESS; WITH PROPER CARE, ALTERATION OF THE EVIDENCE IS ELIMINATED. THE WALK THROUGH DETERMINES THE BOUNDARIES OF CONCERN. THE AREA IS THEN DIVIDED INTO SMALLER SECTIONS, AND THE RETRIEVAL PROCESS BEGINS. MOST EVIDENCE IS RETRIEVED WITH LITTLE DIFFICULTY IF THE OBJECT CAN BE PICKED UP AND MOVED. WHENEVER EVIDENCE IS TO BE REMOVED FROM IMMOVABLE OBJECTS, PHOTOGRAPHS AND SKETCHES SHOULD SHOW RELATIONSHIPS TO THE OBJECT ON WHICH THE EVIDENCE IS FOUND AND TO THE COMPOSITE CRIME SCENE. EACH BIT OF EVIDENCE MUST BE MARKED AS TO TIME, DATE, AND INVESTIGATOR IN A MANNER WHICH WILL NOT CONTAMINATE THE ITEM. FOR EXAMPLE, CLOTHING SHOULD BE MARKED ON THE INNER LINING, AND LIQUIDS SHOULD BE PLACED IN SUITABLE CONTAINERS WITH LABELS. PROPER STORAGE IS IMPORTANT FOR MAINTAINING THE VALUE OF EVIDENCE. ONCE EVIDENCE IS OBTAINED, THE CHAIN OF POSSESSION OF THE ITEM MUST BE MAINTAINED UNTIL THE EVIDENCE IS PRESENTED IN COURT OR RETURNED TO THE VICTIM OR SUSPECT. EVIDENCE SHOULD BE PACKAGED IN CONTAINERS APPROPRIATE TO THE ITEM'S SIZE. TOOLS FOUND AT THE CRIME SCENE SHOULD BE PACKED SO AS NOT TO DESTROY THE CUTTING OR STRIKING EDGE. PROJECTILES SHOULD ALSO BE CAREFULLY HANDLED AND PACKED. DOCUMENTS, ENVELOPES, AND CHECKS SHOULD BE PLACED IN TRANSPARENT ENVELOPES.
Index Term(s): Crime scene; Crime Scene Investigation; Criminal investigation; Criminalistics; Evidence collection; Evidence preservation; Forensic medicine; Medicolegal considerations
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=68922

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