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NCJ Number: 69021 Find in a Library
Title: PROBATION OFFICERS IN PENAL INSTITUTIONS (FROM PRESSURES AND CHANGES IN THE PROBATION SERVICE, P 100-114, 1979, BY JOAN F S KING - SEE NCJ-69015)
Author(s): B STOKES
Corporate Author: University of Cambridge
United Kingdom
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 15
Sponsoring Agency: University of Cambridge
Cambridge, CB3 9DT, England
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: United Kingdom
Annotation: PENAL INSTITUTIONS, IF THEY ARE TO PERSIST, MUST BECOME MORE FLEXIBLE IN THEIR SERVICES AND ALLOW FOR COLLABORATION BETWEEN PROBATION AND PRISON OFFICERS AND BETWEEN THE PRISON AND THE COMMUNITY.
Abstract: WHILE PRISON STAFF HAVE FELT DEPRIVED OF FUNCTIONS, WITH THE JOB SATISFACTIONS AND STATUS ATTACHED TO THEM, BY THE INTRODUCTION INTO THE PRISONS OF SUCCESSIVE WAVES OF SPECIALISTS, PROBATION OFFICERS BEING ASSIGNED TO PRISONS TO FULFILL SOCIAL WELFARE TYPE SERVICES HAVE SEEN A CLASH BETWEEN THE LIBERTY AND VALUE OF THE INDIVIDUAL AND THE PREOCCUPATION OF PENAL INSTITUTIONS WITH SECURITY. YET, INTRODUCING PROBATION OFFICERS TO THE PRISONS CAN HELP TO FREE THEM FROM WORK INAPPROPRIATE TO THEIR QUALIFICATIONS AND ROLE (CUSTODIAL AND WELFARE WORK) AND CAN HELP TO ENCOURAGE PRISON STAFF TO PLAY A FURTHER PART IN THE WELFARE OF THOSE IN CUSTODY. A BRITISH HOME OFFICE RESEARCH STUDY OF FIVE PILOT SCHEMES SHOWS THAT THE PROBATION OFFICERS IN THE ESTABLISHMENTS CONCERNED FEEL THAT THEY HAVE BEEN ABLE TO MAKE A CONSTRUCTIVE CONTRIBUTION TO THE PRISONS IN DEVELOPING SOCIAL WORK, BEING AVAILABLE TO SHARE INFORMATION, ACTING AS CONSULTANTS WHERE NECESSARY, AND AS COORDINATORS AND PLANNERS OF AFTERCARE. THE INSTITUTIONS INDICATED THEIR NEED TO PROVIDE, WITHIN A MIXED TEAM OF PROBATION AND PRISON STAFF, A WIDE RANGE OF RESOURCES AND EXPERIENCES FOR PRISONERS, INCLUDING PERSONAL SUPPORT AND SKILLS TRAINING. PRISON OFFICERS HAVE, IN THIS CONTEXT, BEEN IN THE FIRST LINE OF APPROACH. THE KINDS OF PRISONER BEST SERVED HAVE APPEARED TO BE THOSE IN NEED OF EMOTIONAL HELP AND WERE THOUGHT TO PRESENT THE GREATEST RISKS TO THE COMMUNITY. THE PROBATION OFFICER CAN STIMULATE AUTONOMY IN CLIENTS, WHILE THE PRISON OFFICER CAN TEACH DISCIPLINE AND MAINTAIN ORDER AND CONTROL. SIXTEEN REFERENCES ARE PROVIDED.
Index Term(s): Correctional personnel; Correctional reform; Probation or parole officers
Note: NCJ-69021 AVAILABLE ON MICROFICHE FROM NCJRS UNDER NCJ-69015
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=69021

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